Introducing new faces and innovative ideas to our campus community

Each year, the institute supports an interdisciplinary, international speaker series focused on a theme of global importance. The series complements the Colgate curriculum, providing students and faculty with opportunities to work with the speakers in the classroom and in informal discussion.

Fall 2019 Events

Past Lampert Institute and PPE Events

Reproductive Rights as Human Rights

Loretta Ross, Visiting Associate Professor, Women's Studies, Hampshire College
Thursday, January 25, 2018, 4:30pm, Golden Auditorium

Reproductive Justice moves beyond choice and access to abortion. The term was coined by African American women, including Ross, in 1994, following the International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo, Egypt. It is a broader term that uses a human rights framework and also looks at reproductive oppression, sterilization abuse, immigration restrictions, gun culture, rape culture, the prison-to-school pipeline, etc. This presentation covers all aspects of Reproductive Justice which is becoming the primary framework new voices in the movement are using to move beyond the paralyzing debates of abortion politics.

Part of the Lampert Speaker Series and Co-sponsored by The ALANA Cultural Center, The Department of Sociology and Anthropology, and the Women’s Studies Program.

Religious Rights in Contemporary America: A Colgate Faculty Panel"

Timothy Byrnes (Political Science), David Dudrick (Philosophy), Jenna Reinbold (Religion)
Thursday, February 15, 2018, 4:30pm, 101 Ho Science Center

With a growing emphasis on equality in recent decades, questions concerning the extent and nature of religious rights have taken on particular importance. The protections for freedom and autonomy provided by such rights are often seen to be coming into conflict with other central human rights. In this panel, three distinguished Colgate faculty members address central questions concerning the status of religious rights in a contemporary context.

"Race and the Right to Education in America"

Derrick Darby '88, Professor of Philosophy, University of Michigan
Thursday, April 5, 2018, 4:30pm, 101 Ho Science Center

Article 26 of the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights asserts that everyone has the right to education, that education should develop human personality, promote respect for human rights, and that it should promote racial tolerance. This talk will examine the role of race in American education to argue that K-12 schools—contaminated with the poison of the nation's racist history—are rigged in ways that assail the dignity of black students and undermine the realization of these human rights ideals.

"On God's Authority? Religious Liberty in a Marriage Equality World"

John Corvino, Professor of Philosophy, Wayne State University
Tuesday, April 24, 2018, 4:30pm, 101 Ho Science Center

Now that same-sex marriage is legal throughout the U.S., conflicts are emerging among objectors who do not wish to facilitate same-sex weddings: clerks who do not wish to issue marriage licenses; bakers, florists, and caterers who do not wish to provide services for the receptions, and so on. Is it possible to oppose discrimination while also respecting religious liberty? In this talk, John draws on the research for his new book, Debating Religious Liberty and Discrimination, to provide a thoughtful response.

"Genetic Privacy: Fifty Years of Erosion"

Philip Reilly, PhD; Third Rock Ventures
Friday, October 13, 2017, 3pm, 101 Ho Science Center

The Idea that Genetic Privacy is a right that should be vigorously protected has been an important theme in bioethics and law for many decades. While much effort has gone into trying to protect one's privacy, several trends suggest that it will soon be a routine part of health care to acquire and interrogate individual genomes. While there may be some success in limiting access to one's personal genetic data, technological trends are strongly eroding this possibility. What is the best path to take to protect our personal interest in privacy in the Century of the Genome?

"Five Freedoms for the Middle East"

Micheline Ishay, International Human Rights Program, University of Denver
Thursday, October 26, 2017, 4pm, 101 Ho Science Center

In his 1941 State of the Union speech, President Franklin Roosevelt proclaimed America's commitment to four pillars of freedom to which all humans are entitled: freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear. Following the allied victory over Fascism, these ideals would find tangible expression in the comprehensive post-world war effort, including the establishment of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Marshall Plan and NATO. Eleanor Roosevelt lent considerable influence to the improvement of women's rights, and freedom from sexual discriminaton. Drawing on the legacy of the Roosevelts, how can these five freedoms be realized in today's Middle East?

"The Human Right to a Healthy Environment"

John H. Knox, Henry C. Lauerman Professor of International Law, Wake Forest University United Nations 
Thursday, November 9, 2017, 4:30pm, 101 Ho Science Center

The 2016 election has brought to light a longstanding hostility among many Americans toward the ideals of international governance and universal human rights. Given the widespread tendency to associate human rights with the values and legacies of nations such as the Britain and The United States, how do we make sense of this hostility? Reinbold explores today's American anti-human-rights discourse and highlights some of its deep religious dynamics. Ultimately, Reinbold reveals the ways in which some of the very features of human rights that were designed to create global accord are also features that have inflamed nativist resistance to such rights in the United States.

"The Human Right to a Healthy Environment"

John H. Knox, Henry C. Lauerman Professor of International Law, Wake Forest University United Nations 
Thursday, November 9, 2017, 4:30pm, 101 Ho Science Center

The 2016 election has brought to light a longstanding hostility among many Americans toward the ideals of international governance and universal human rights. Given the widespread tendency to associate human rights with the values and legacies of nations such as the Britain and The United States, how do we make sense of this hostility? Reinbold explores today's American anti-human-rights discourse and highlights some of its deep religious dynamics. Ultimately, Reinbold reveals the ways in which some of the very features of human rights that were designed to create global accord are also features that have inflamed nativist resistance to such rights in the United States.

"Human Rights in the Era of the Alt-Right"

Jenna Reinbold, Assistant Professor of Religion, Colgate University
Thursday, November 9, 2017, 4:30pm, 101 Ho Science Center

The 2016 election has brought to light a longstanding hostility among many Americans toward the ideals of international governance and universal human rights. Given the widespread tendency to associate human rights with the values and legacies of nations such as the Britain and The United States, how do we make sense of this hostility? Reinbold explores today's American anti-human-rights discourse and highlights some of its deep religious dynamics. Ultimately, Reinbold reveals the ways in which some of the very features of human rights that were designed to create global accord are also features that have inflamed nativist resistance to such rights in the United States.

"Indigenous Peoples in Global Organizations: Human Rights and the Politics of Difference"

Ronald Niezen, Faculty of Law and Department of Anthropology, McGill University
Tuesday, November 28, 2017, 4:30pm, 101 Ho Science Center

Since their first appearance in the UN in the late 1970's, the advocates and organizations working on behalf of indigenous peoples have made significant changes to international law and opened new spaces for participation in the United Nations. How might (or might not) these new conditions of visibility contribute to human rights compliance by states? This question leads us to a wider consideration of the leverage points of public dissent and diplomacy in global organizations, how activists can sometimes bring about recognition and restitution in institutions built upon the privilege of the very powerful.

"America’s Changing International Role Under the Trump Administration"

Panel Discussion Featuring: Ellen Kraly (GEOG), Andy Pattison (ENST) and Rishi Sharma (ECON)
Tuesday, January 31, 2017, 4:30pm, 101 Ho Science Center 

The incoming Trump administration has suggested that it will depart significantly from past administrations with respect to many key aspects of American foreign policy. These changes have the potential to radically re-shape the United States’ international role. This panel will explore some of these potential changes and their implications, with a focus on issues of immigration, trade, and climate change.

"Doing Well By Doing Good: A Panel Discussion About Careers in International Relief Work"

Tim LaRose, communications specialist with UNICEF during the Ebola outbreak in 2014-16; Tracey Hansel, doctor who served with Indian Health Services and Doctors without Borders; Christina Hawley, policy advocate for several international aid organizations; Susan Thomson, Peace and Conflict Studies, Colgate. 
Thursday, February 9, 2017, 4:30pm, 105 Lawrence Hall Co-Sponsored by Career Services, the COVE, Peace and Conflict Studies, and Off-Campus Study

This panel will provide the audience an opportunity to learn from persons with practical experience in the field of international relief work. Each participant will speak about his/her experiences and offer advice for those considering a career in international relief work; this will be followed by questions and discussion with the audience.

"Immigration Reform: Perspectives from the Front Lines of Our Broken Immigration System"

Todd Schulte, President, FWD.us
Wednesday, February 22, 2017, 4:15pm, 101 Ho Science Center 

Todd Schulte is the president of FWD.us, an organization started by key leaders from the technology community — including Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg and Reid Hoffman — to promote policies to keep the United States competitive in a global economy, starting with commonsense immigration reform. He will discuss immigration policy and its impact on the science and technology fields.

"International Migration and Human Mobility: Opportunity or Threat in an Interconnected and Insecure World"

Michele Klein Solomon (’83), Director of the Migration Policy, Research and Communications Department, International Organization for Migration
Wednesday, March 8, 2017, 4:30pm, 101 Ho Science Center 

International migration is at the top of national and international policy and political agendas. With 244 million international migrants in the world today, some 23 million of whom are refugees fleeing conflict and persecution, the numbers are at the highest recorded levels ever, yet represent just some 3.2 percent of the global population. Beyond sending back money, migrants foster skills, educational and investment flows into their countries of origin, and fill critical jobs and provide essential skills to their host countries, often resulting in entrepreneurship, business and job creation in their host societies. 
At the same time, global security concerns make it all the more essential that governments know which non-nationals are entering their countries, and manage the potential security and economic implications of migration. Rising xenophobia and discrimination in many parts of the world, combined with security fears, have made the debate around migration toxic, making it difficult to have a rational, evidence-based discussion and approach to policy formulation. Is international migration an opportunity or threat in an interconnected and insecure world? How can national and global policies harness the positive potential of migration while reducing both the incidence and impact of forced and irregular migration?

"Environmental Refugees: The Coming Tide"

Dr. Robert McLeman, Department of Geography, Wilfrid Laurier University
Thursday, March 23, 2017, 4:30pm, 101 Ho Science Center Department of Geography Gould Lecture, Co-Sponsored by the Lampert Institute

Dr. McLeman will review recent examples from around the world to explain how environmental events trigger large scale displacements and migration, and what happens to those who leave and those left behind. The vulnerability of people to particular types of environmental hazards and the potential for building adaptive communities will be explored. While the future impacts of climate change will almost certainly lead to increased migration flows, Dr. McLeman will outline opportunities for reducing future risks through proactive planning, sound policymaking, and renewed commitment to environmental sustainability.

"In Safe Hands? Refugee Children and Sexual and Gender-Based Violence in Kenya"

Dr. Rosalind Raddatz, Department of Politics and International Studies, University of Cambridge
Monday, April 17, 2017, 4:30pm, 101 Ho Science Center Co-Sponsored by Africana and Latin American Studies, Peace and Conflict Studies, and Women’s Studies

The vast majority of unaccompanied minor refugees have experienced multiple forms of sexual and gender based violence in their countries of origin. Refugee children perceive Kenya as a safe haven. Instead, they face additional abuse. SGBV is widely acknowledged to exist and be widespread against refugees residing in Kenya, including unaccompanied refugee children, but until now there has been no empirical data to support the claim. With results from the only mixed methods study to consider the topic in Kenya, this presentation will shed light on the existence and prevalence of SGBV among refugee children residing in the country's urban areas.