Intergroup dialogue is an educational model that brings together community members from diverse social identities in a cooperative, small-group learning environment.

Colgate Conversations

Colgate Conversations have come in the form of weekly brownbag discussions, peer-driven and student leadership workshops, full-day symposiums, and staff/faculty-led Orientation presentations. They all use an intergroup dialogue (IGD) approach to encourage individuals to explore the complexities of social identities (religion, race/ethnicity, gender, class, etc) to improve communication and relationships between individuals from different social backgrounds. Through experiential learning opportunities, Colgate Conversations fosters an understanding of how individual perspectives are rooted in systems of power and privilege and provides an opportunity for community members to work together across difference toward purposeful social change.

How to Get Involved

Intergroup dialogue often involves members of groups with a history of conflict or limited opportunities to engage in deep and meaningful discussion of controversial, challenging, or divisive issues.

Look for the "Colgate Conversations" name, in the form of weekly brownbag discussions, peer-driven and student leadership workshops, and staff/faculty-led Orientation presentations. They all use an IGD approach to encourage individuals to explore the complexities of social identities (religion, race/ethnicity, gender, class, etc) to improve communication and relationships between individuals from different social backgrounds. Through experiential learning opportunities, Colgate Conversations fosters an understanding of how individual perspectives are rooted in systems of power and privilege and provides an opportunity for community members to work together across difference toward purposeful social change. 
Contact us: igd@colgate.edu

Every Spring semester the Office of Equity and Diversity, Dean of the College, Dean of Faculty and ALANA Cultural Center have collaborated on 2-day IGD experiential workshops. 

The next 2-Day IGD Experience workshop for faculty and staff took place January 13-14, 2020. Stay tuned for the announcement of future workshop dates.

Denise Larson '19 explored how attending IGD-based brown bag events impacted her perspective, and why it is something every student should experience, in the Odyssey Online:
A LESSON IN GETTING COMFORTABLE WITH BEING UNCOMFORTABLE 

Spring 2020 Colgate Conversations Brown Bag Series (Mondays 12:15-1:15pm)

January 27: “How Change-Agents Listen: Seeing Possibility” (213 Benton Hall)
Meika Loe (Professor of Sociology and Women's Studies) and Rodney Agnant (Assistant Director of Programming and Lead Facilitator, Chapel House)

This workshop will focus on a central IGD activity: generative listening. Participants will take part in a partnered listening exercise that allows them to reflect on changes they have made in their lives. We will focus on listening skills and practice thinking about human agency and the potential for social change in both small and large groups.

February 3: "Can I Fit in if I'm Sober? Is Colgate's social scene incomplete without alcohol and/or drug use?" (213 Benton Hall)
Esther Rosbrook (Assistant Director, ALANA Cultural Center) and Vicki Coates (Program Coordinator, Shaw Wellness Institute)

Alcohol and drug use often feels necessary in order to fit into Colgate's social scene. Drawing on IGD principles, this presentation explores the motivations of substance use and how abstaining, use, or misuse might impact a student's experience at Colgate. 

February 10: "Are You In the Right Place? - How Microaggressions Connect to Political Discourse and Public Policy"  (213 Benton Hall)
Jeremy Wattles (Director, COVE) and Chimebere Nwaoduh (Assistant Director of Residential Life, Brown Commons)

Have you ever heard one of your peers say things like "People are too sensitive on this campus," ask "Why we can't keep politics out of this conversation?", or claim they aren't political?  How do individual microaggressions connect to our wider social fabric and political structures? Come listen and share dialogue with us on this topic.

February 17: “Recognizing and Interrupting White Supremacy Culture” (200 Benton Hall (NOTE location change))
Odette Rodriguez (Program Coordinator, Center for Women's Studies) and co-facilitator TBA

White supremacy culture is an artificial, historically constructed culture which expresses and justifies white supremacy as a system of power. As such, characteristics of our larger culture can often reflect and reinforce white supremacy through seemingly mundane or innocuous ways. This session will help to identify and name manifestations of white supremacy while developing tools to combat it.

Colgate faculty are incorporating IGD methodologies into curricular courses. Interested students may contact faculty members directly to express interest in joining a course. Faculty members will manage course enrollment to ensure representation of diverse groups of participants, in line with IGD pedagogy.

PAST COURSES CAN BE FOUND HERE

The Wellness Passport Program allows students to attend a variety of classes, workshops, and events — including IGD-based "Colgate Conversations" — encompassing the eight dimensions of wellness to earn PHED credit.

Faculty in the Colgate libraries have compiled key educational and informational resources related to the themes and theories of intergroup dialogue.

EXPLORE LIBRARY RESOURCES