International Relations First Year Courses

DirectorF. Chernoff
PROGRAM SITE

For students interested in the study of international relations as a major or minor, Colgate offers an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. International Relations majors acquire a broad knowledge of world politics through directed study in political science, economics, diplomatic history, and language training. Students are also invited to participate in on-campus programs supported by the International Relations program.

Students interested in majoring in International Relations should begin language training and take the program’s introductory course, POSC 232, or ECON 151, or a related HIST course. Students who have AP credit for ECON 151 must take one additional elective course. POSC 152 can offer a general introduction to international relations, but does not ordinarily count toward the IR major.

In addition to campus activities and study, students are strongly encouraged to participate in an off-campus study group for a semester. The Political Science department and International Relations program sponsor an annual study group in Geneva, Switzerland, emphasizing global governance. For more details about opportunities and requirements for this study group consult the description under Political Science. Students seeking other opportunities for off-campus study may also consider other Colgate study groups or approved programs.

Colgate University has recently established a five-year, BA+MA program with the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva that may be of interest to students pursuing International Relations. In this program, students can receive a BA from Colgate and an MA from the Graduate Institute by completing three of their final four semesters (years 4 and 5) at the Graduate Institute. For more information on this program, students may contact the program director (fchernoff@colgate.edu).

Questions about the International Relations program may be directed to the director (fchernoff@colgate.edu) and the program’s web page.

Courses

 

A general introduction to the subject matter and analytical tools of economics including micro- and macroeconomic theory.

U.S. foreign relations from the entry into the Great War to the present. Topics include the unquiet "normalcy" of the 1920s, origins of U.S. participation in the Second World War, the atomic bombs, the Cold War, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, arms control, the end of the Cold War, and the new world of terrorism and conflict. (US)

An introduction to Middle Eastern politics, including historical foundations of the modern Middle East, competing strategies of state building, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Gulf War, the rise of political Islam, and American policy toward the region.

Designed to provide students with an understanding of how international politics — politics between governments — differs from politics within a state. Students consider how the international system has evolved and currently operates, and examines some of the enduring questions of international relations: Why is there war? How can war be avoided? Is international equality a prerequisite for order? Can order, justice, and cooperation be achieved in a non-institutionalized and non-hierarchical system? (IR)

An introduction to Middle Eastern politics, including historical foundations of the modern Middle East, competing strategies of state building, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Gulf War, the rise of political Islam, and American policy toward the region. (CO)

An introduction to the basic approaches to international relations, such as realism, idealism, and the interdependence school. Students also consider fundamental problems of national security, the uses of power, the causes of war, the nature of international institutions, the relationships among security, deterrence, conflict escalation, and nuclear proliferation. (IR)