The Department of Theater at Colgate University educates students in the interdisciplinary, artistic practice of theater through courses in acting, directing, stagecraft, and design, as well as elective courses in playwriting and dance.  In addition, majors study theater as a social and cultural institution through a minimum of two courses in theater history and dramatic literature. 

Theater students at Colgate learn by doing in the intellectually and physically rigorous environment of studio courses, rehearsals, and public performances.  The theater curriculum transcends the artificial split of mind - body, encouraging students to develop skills in both logic and intuition that apply to any field of endeavor.  A major or minor in theater fosters students’ ability to read closely, think critically, and communicate clearly – not only through speech and writing, but also through embodied presence.  Students of theater are trained to integrate analytical, physical, emotional, and interpersonal intelligence in a way that few other courses of study demand.  
 
All students regardless of their majors may participate in University Theater and Dance productions, concerts and workshops.  Stop by our office on the 2nd Floor of the DANA ARTS Building for more information on auditions, classes and visiting artists.

Courses

Explores the dramatic challenge of producing a Greek tragedy. Students focus on a Greek play of global impact, one that is performed all over the world today in a variety of different cultural and social contexts. Students begin with an introductory segment that explores what is distinctive about Greek tragedy and has made it a central part of an increasingly complex theatrical canon. The course concludes with students working in groups to experiment with and stage their own interpretations of scenes from the play.

What is performance? The verb "to perform" can be variously defined as "to carry out an action," "to discharge a duty," "to accomplish a task," and "to present to an audience." Interdisciplinary in nature, students explores performance in the context of the performing and media arts, as well as in the context of ritual, politics, and everyday life. Emphasizes the relationship between performance and race, gender, sexuality, and other vectors of identity: how are various types of difference enacted, articulated, and represented through performative acts?

Faculty Profile for Professor Giurgea 

Theatre acting provides a lifelong foundation for independent inquiry. Focuses is on illuminating the correlations between mind, body, and brain, in the process of acting, cultivates students’ self awareness, attention, and concentration, and enhances their ability to communicate and adapt to collective work. Through practical and theoretical assignments, class activities and performance, students acquire skills in the art and craft of acting and learn about theatre. Students who successfully complete this seminar will receive credit for THEA 254 and satisfy one half of the Human Thought and Expression area of inquiry requirement. 

Professor Simona Giurgea studied theatre at the Academy of Theatre, Film and Television in Bucharest, Romania, where she earned her MFA in Acting and started teaching in 1991. She worked in repertory theatre from the age of eighteen. Her professional experience includes: acting, directing, set and costume design, coaching, movement instruction, musical theatre, television, film and radio credits, national (Romania) and international workshops and tours in Italy, Belgium, Germany, and Egypt. 

In the United States, she taught both in graduate and undergraduate programs at the American Conservatory Theatre in San Francisco, University of California at Riverside, California State University in Long Beach, Pomona College, and Colgate University. 

At Colgate University (2005-2019) she teaches classes in acting and directing, Children Theatre Workshop, Senior Seminar, supervises senior projects, and directs University Theatre productions.

Explores the dramatic challenge of producing a Greek tragedy. Students focus on a Greek play of global impact, one that is performed all over the world today in a variety of different cultural and social contexts. Students begin with an introductory segment that explores what is distinctive about Greek tragedy and has made it a central part of an increasingly complex theatrical canon. The course concludes with students working in groups to experiment with and stage their own interpretations of scenes from the play.

Required lab; see THEA 220 for more information.

What is performance? The verb "to perform" can be variously defined as "to carry out an action," "to discharge a duty," "to accomplish a task," and "to present to an audience." Interdisciplinary in nature, students explores performance in the context of the performing and media arts, as well as in the context of ritual, politics, and everyday life. Emphasizes the relationship between performance and race, gender, sexuality, and other vectors of identity: how are various types of difference enacted, articulated, and represented through performative acts?

An introduction to acting as art, discipline and craft. This course provides a practical and theoretical introduction to the basic skills of acting. No prior acting experience is required. The course consists of individual and ensemble exercises to develop physical awareness, concentration, and imagination. The course is aimed at enhancing self-confidence, expressiveness, and creativity. Acting teaches poise and presence, vocal and physical coordination. Through corporeal exercises, improvisations, play analysis, and scene work students acquire a working vocabulary in the fundamentals of acting. The course culminates with in-class performance work.

 

Credit for performance in a University Theater production. May be repeated up to three times for credit. The University Theater production is an opportunity offered to students to be involved in a production directed either by a Colgate faculty member or by an artist in residence. The production is cast through an audition process, which usually occurs at the beginning of each semester. Students may also receive credit through working on the production in a substantial technical or production related role.

Introduces students to the concepts and practice of contemporary dance. Students gain confidence, fluidity, and control of their movement expression.

General principles of playwriting. The goal of the course is the creation of a finished work: a one-act play, one act of a longer play, or a complete play. Writing for the theater represents emotional and artistic commitment and intellectual pursuit. As part of the learning process, students tackle the artistic and pragmatic challenges of building methodically from the seeds of inspiration to the crafting of the well-written play. Text analysis investigates classic and modern plays. The class is a first-hand initiation into the vocabulary and technique of collaboration for the development of original material.