First Year Program - Liberal Arts Core Skip Navigation

Liberal Arts Core Curriculum

The Liberal Arts Core Curriculum is comprised of the Common Core and Global Engagements requirements.

Common Core (CORE)

Director: N. Ries
PROGRAM SITE

The Common Core Curriculum consists of four required interdisciplinary components. The first two components are taught by faculty members from across the university who work together to develop these courses: all sections of these two courses share common texts. Legacies of the Ancient World explores texts from the ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern world that have given rise to philosophical, political, religious, and artistic traditions that continue to influence academic and intellectual discourse and critical thought. In Challenges of Modernity, students explore a variety of texts that engage with the modern ideas and phenomena that have shaped the world in which we live. Scientific Perspectives on the World (SP) courses engage issues of broader social significance that require scientific literacy. These courses are multi-disciplinary in focus: the topics of SP courses span the study of the physical world, biological processes, human behavior, mathematical methods, and technological innovations. Communities and Identities (CI) courses provide students with a multi-layered understanding of identities, cultures, and human experiences in particular geographically distinct communities and regions of the world.

Students are expected to complete the four common core courses by the end of their sophomore year. Approximately half of the fall 2018 FSEMs fulfill a Liberal Arts Core Curriculum requirement.

Courses - Legacies of Ancient World

View all with day/time information
CORE 151, Legacies of Ancient World
Explores ancient texts that articulate perennial issues, such as the nature of the human and the divine; virtue and the good life; the true, the just, and the beautiful; the difference between subjective opinion and objective knowledge. These texts exemplify basic modes of speech, literary forms, and patterns of thinking that establish the terminology of academic and intellectual discourse and critical thought across many different societies: epic, rhetoric, tragedy, poetry, epistemology, science, democracy, rationality, the soul, spirit, law, grace. Such terms have shaped the patterns of life, norms, and prejudices that human communities have continually challenged, criticized, and refashioned throughout history. To highlight both the dialogue and conflicts between the texts and the traditions they embody, this course, taught by a multidisciplinary staff and in an interdisciplinary manner, focuses on both the historical contexts of these texts and the ongoing retellings and reinterpretations of them through time. The course includes texts from the ancient Mediterranean world that have given rise to some of the philosophical, political, religious, and artistic traditions associated with “The West,” emphasizing that Western traditions were not formed in a vacuum but developed in dialogue and conflict with other traditions. Common to all sections of this component are classic works such as Homer, the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, Plato, and a Roman text. Complementary texts or visual materials from the ancient period, in and beyond the Western world, and/or response texts from the medieval or contemporary periods are added by faculty in individual sections.

FSEM 100, Legacies of the Ancient World
Faculty Profile for Professor Ammerman

Explores ancient texts that articulate perennial issues: the nature of the human and the divine; the virtues and the good life; the true, the just and the beautiful; the difference between subjective opinion and objective knowledge. These texts exemplify basic modes of speech, literary forms, and patterns of thinking that establish the terminology of academic and intellectual discourse and critical thought: epic, rhetoric, tragedy, epistemology, science, democracy, rationality, the soul, spirit, law, grace. Such terms have shaped the patterns of life, norms, and prejudices that have been continually challenged, criticized, and refashioned throughout history. To highlight both the dialogue and conflicts between the texts and the traditions they embody, this course, taught by a multidisciplinary staff and in an interdisciplinary manner, focuses on both the historical contexts of these texts and the ongoing retellings and reinterpretations of them through time. Moreover, the course includes texts from the ancient Mediterranean world that have given rise to some of the philosophical, political, religious, and artistic traditions associated with “The West,” emphasizing that Western traditions were not formed in a vacuum but developed in dialogue and conflict with other traditions, some of which lie beyond the geographical area of “The West.” Common to all sections of this component are classic works such as Homer, the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, Plato, and a Roman text. Complementary texts or visual materials from the ancient period, in and beyond the Western world, and/or response texts from the medieval or contemporary periods are added in individual sections or groups of sections. Thus, some groups of sections may have particular themes. These themes will be identified at registration every term. Students who successfully complete one of these seminars will satisfy the Legacies of the Ancient World core requirement.

Rebecca Miller Ammerman is a classical archaeologist who is directing a new cycle of excavations at the Greco-Roman site of Paestum in southern Italy. Her research focuses on city-states that were founded by Greeks in the 7th century BCE and eventually conquered by Rome in the third century BCE. She is particularly interested in the religious practices of the different ethnic populations—Greeks, native Italic peoples, and later Romans—who inhabited these sites.

FSEM 101, Legacies of the Ancient World
Faculty Profile for Professor Dauber

Explores ancient texts that articulate perennial issues: the nature of the human and the divine; the virtues and the good life; the true, the just and the beautiful; the difference between subjective opinion and objective knowledge. These texts exemplify basic modes of speech, literary forms, and patterns of thinking that establish the terminology of academic and intellectual discourse and critical thought: epic, rhetoric, tragedy, epistemology, science, democracy, rationality, the soul, spirit, law, grace. Such terms have shaped the patterns of life, norms, and prejudices that have been continually challenged, criticized, and refashioned throughout history. To highlight both the dialogue and conflicts between the texts and the traditions they embody, this course, taught by a multidisciplinary staff and in an interdisciplinary manner, focuses on both the historical contexts of these texts and the ongoing retellings and reinterpretations of them through time. Moreover, the course includes texts from the ancient Mediterranean world that have given rise to some of the philosophical, political, religious, and artistic traditions associated with “The West,” emphasizing that Western traditions were not formed in a vacuum but developed in dialogue and conflict with other traditions, some of which lie beyond the geographical area of “The West.” Common to all sections of this component are classic works such as Homer, the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, Plato, and a Roman text. Complementary texts or visual materials from the ancient period, in and beyond the Western world, and/or response texts from the medieval or contemporary periods are added in individual sections or groups of sections. Thus, some groups of sections may have particular themes. These themes will be identified at registration every term. Students who successfully complete one of these seminars will satisfy the Legacies of the Ancient World core requirement.

In this section of Legacies of the Ancient World, students will focus on the various mentalities of antiquity--from the flinty Romanitas of Caesar's opponents to the apocalyptic visions of justice of the Hebrew prophets. Students will see how the great books of antiquity are both representative of these mentalities and critical of them. Above all, students will learn through the study of literary genre and ethical argument "how to think like a book." The emphasis will be on close reading, both in class and out, and on practicing writing analytically.

Noah Dauber, associate professor of Political Science, specializes in the history of political thought. His focus is on the emergence of the idea of the state in early modern Europe.

FSEM 102, Legacies of the Ancient World
Faculty Profile for Professor Swain

Explores ancient texts that articulate perennial issues: the nature of the human and the divine; the virtues and the good life; the true, the just and the beautiful; the difference between subjective opinion and objective knowledge. These texts exemplify basic modes of speech, literary forms, and patterns of thinking that establish the terminology of academic and intellectual discourse and critical thought: epic, rhetoric, tragedy, epistemology, science, democracy, rationality, the soul, spirit, law, grace. Such terms have shaped the patterns of life, norms, and prejudices that have been continually challenged, criticized, and refashioned throughout history. To highlight both the dialogue and conflicts between the texts and the traditions they embody, this course, taught by a multidisciplinary staff and in an interdisciplinary manner, focuses on both the historical contexts of these texts and the ongoing retellings and reinterpretations of them through time. Moreover, the course includes texts from the ancient Mediterranean world that have given rise to some of the philosophical, political, religious, and artistic traditions associated with “The West,” emphasizing that Western traditions were not formed in a vacuum but developed in dialogue and conflict with other traditions, some of which lie beyond the geographical area of “The West.” Common to all sections of this component are classic works such as Homer, the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, Plato, and a Roman text. Complementary texts or visual materials from the ancient period, in and beyond the Western world, and/or response texts from the medieval or contemporary periods are added in individual sections or groups of sections. Thus, some groups of sections may have particular themes. These themes will be identified at registration every term. Students who successfully complete one of these seminars will satisfy the Legacies of the Ancient World core requirement.

Joseph P. Swain writes music criticism and critical theory.

Courses - Challenges of Modernity

View all with day/time information
CORE 152, Challenges of Modernity
Modernity is a crucial element of the intellectual legacy to which we are heirs. A matrix of intellectual, social, and material forces that have transformed the world over the last quarter millennium, modernity has introduced new problems and possibilities into human life. Within modernity, issues of meaning, identity, and morality have been critiqued in distinctive ways. People of different social classes, racial groups, ethnic backgrounds, genders and sexual identities have contributed to an increasingly rich public discourse. The human psyche has been problematized, and the dynamic character of the world, both natural and social, has been explored. Urbanization and technological development have transformed the patterns of everyday life. Imperialism has had a complex and lasting impact on the entire globe. The human capability to ameliorate social and physical ills has increased exponentially, and yet so has the human capacity for mass destruction and exploitation. In this course, taught by an interdisciplinary staff, students explore texts from a variety of media that engage with the ideas and phenomena central to modernity. To ensure a substantially common experience for students, the staff each year chooses texts to be taught in all sections of the course. This component of the Core Curriculum encourages students to think broadly and critically about the world that they inhabit, asking them to see their contemporary concerns in the perspective of the long-standing discourses of modernity.

FSEM 105, Challenges of Modernity
Faculty Profile for Professor Miller

Modernity is a crucial element of the intellectual legacy to which we are heirs. A matrix of intellectual, social, and material forces that have transformed the world over the last quarter millennium, modernity has introduced new problems and possibilities into human life. Within modernity, issues of meaning, identity, and morality have been critiqued in distinctive ways. People of different social classes, racial groups, ethnic backgrounds, genders, and sexual identities have contributed to an increasingly rich public discourse. The human psyche has been problematized, and the dynamic character of the world, both natural and social, has been explored. Urbanization and technological development have transformed the patterns of everyday life. Imperialism has had a complex and lasting impact on the entire globe. The human capability to ameliorate social and physical ills has increased exponentially, and yet so has the human capacity for mass destruction and exploitation. In these seminars students explore texts from a variety of media that engage with the ideas and phenomena central to modernity. This component of the Core Curriculum encourages students to think broadly and critically about the world that they inhabit, asking them to see their contemporary concerns in the perspective of the long-standing discourses of modernity. Students who successfully complete one of these seminars will satisfy the Challenges of Modernity core requirement.

Matthew teaches in Colgate’s German Department and the Core Curriculum. A Germanist by training, his research addresses literature and culture across central Europe’s turbulent history, from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. In the Fall of 2018, he is teaching Core 152: Challenges of Modernity (a required component of Colgate’s Core Curriculum) as a First-Year Seminar to introduce incoming Colgate students to education in the liberal arts. Focusing on modernity and education, the course will address influential arguments regarding the value of education for society and the individual. Participating students are invited to grasp higher education as an impassioned, engaged, and critical pursuit of truth and integrity, in an embrace of the imagination and the intellect against manifestations of confusion, helplessness, and apathy in our troubled present.

FSEM 106, Challenges of Modernity
Faculty Profile for Professor Riley

Modernity is a crucial element of the intellectual legacy to which we are heirs. A matrix of intellectual, social, and material forces that have transformed the world over the last quarter millennium, modernity has introduced new problems and possibilities into human life. Within modernity, issues of meaning, identity, and morality have been critiqued in distinctive ways. People of different social classes, racial groups, ethnic backgrounds, genders, and sexual identities have contributed to an increasingly rich public discourse. The human psyche has been problematized, and the dynamic character of the world, both natural and social, has been explored. Urbanization and technological development have transformed the patterns of everyday life. Imperialism has had a complex and lasting impact on the entire globe. The human capability to ameliorate social and physical ills has increased exponentially, and yet so has the human capacity for mass destruction and exploitation. In these seminars students explore texts from a variety of media that engage with the ideas and phenomena central to modernity. This component of the Core Curriculum encourages students to think broadly and critically about the world that they inhabit, asking them to see their contemporary concerns in the perspective of the long-standing discourses of modernity. Students who successfully complete one of these seminars will satisfy the Challenges of Modernity core requirement.

Patrick Riley teaches eighteenth-century French literature and philosophy and has written extensively on autobiography. He is a frequent contributor to the Challenges of Modernity component of the Core.

FSEM 107, Challenges of Modernity
Faculty Profile for Professor Haughwout

Modernity is a crucial element of the intellectual legacy to which we are heirs. A matrix of intellectual, social, and material forces that have transformed the world over the last quarter millennium, modernity has introduced new problems and possibilities into human life. Within modernity, issues of meaning, identity, and morality have been critiqued in distinctive ways. People of different social classes, racial groups, ethnic backgrounds, genders, and sexual identities have contributed to an increasingly rich public discourse. The human psyche has been problematized, and the dynamic character of the world, both natural and social, has been explored. Urbanization and technological development have transformed the patterns of everyday life. Imperialism has had a complex and lasting impact on the entire globe. The human capability to ameliorate social and physical ills has increased exponentially, and yet so has the human capacity for mass destruction and exploitation. In these seminars students explore texts from a variety of media that engage with the ideas and phenomena central to modernity. This component of the Core Curriculum encourages students to think broadly and critically about the world that they inhabit, asking them to see their contemporary concerns in the perspective of the long-standing discourses of modernity.

This section of Challenges of Modernity will give you language and depth to think and speak across gendered, racial, and classed difference; help contextualize our globalized, networked society; and will frame how modernity has shaped our experience of the world beyond the human.

The materials supporting our inquiry are film, fiction, theoretical texts, and historical essays. Our work will materialize as reflective memoirs, dialog, essays, image analyses, and other writings. The work we do in this course will feed whatever discipline you choose to major in, whatever profession you assume…. And it will also sharpen your social media commentary. Students who successfully complete one of these seminars will satisfy the Challenges of Modernity core requirement.

Margaretha Haughwout’s personal and collaborative artwork explores the intersections between ideas of technology and wilderness, digital networks and the urban commons, cybernetics and whole systems permaculture — in the context of ecological, technological and human survival. Her expanded studio includes experimentation with both electrical and political power, interactive narratives, and the cultivation of biological systems. Haughwout’s active collaborations include the Guerrilla Grafters: an art/ activist group who graft fruit bearing branches onto non-fruit bearing, ornamental fruit trees, and the Coastal Reading Group: consisting of artists from different coasts who trouble the subjects of wilderness, speciation, humanness and ways of knowing through diverse engagements with non-humans.

FSEM 108, Challenges of Modernity
Faculty Profile for Professor McVaugh

Modernity is a crucial element of the intellectual legacy to which we are heirs. A matrix of intellectual, social, and material forces that have transformed the world over the last quarter millennium, modernity has introduced new problems and possibilities into human life. Within modernity, issues of meaning, identity, and morality have been critiqued in distinctive ways. People of different social classes, racial groups, ethnic backgrounds, genders, and sexual identities have contributed to an increasingly rich public discourse. The human psyche has been problematized, and the dynamic character of the world, both natural and social, has been explored. Urbanization and technological development have transformed the patterns of everyday life. Imperialism has had a complex and lasting impact on the entire globe. The human capability to ameliorate social and physical ills has increased exponentially, and yet so has the human capacity for mass destruction and exploitation. In these seminars students explore texts from a variety of media that engage with the ideas and phenomena central to modernity. This component of the Core Curriculum encourages students to think broadly and critically about the world that they inhabit, asking them to see their contemporary concerns in the perspective of the long-standing discourses of modernity. Students who successfully complete one of these seminars will satisfy the Challenges of Modernity core requirement.

Professor McVaugh’s current research focus is Colgate campus architecture and the architecture of liberal arts colleges in the 20th Century. He has been very active in the Colgate Core Curriculum for almost forty years.

Courses - Communities & Identities

View all with day/time information
CORE 156C, Southern Africa
Introduces students to the history the major countries of Southern Africa. The course emphasizes that these countries are connected by patterns of culture, migration and economic exchange, political contingencies and warfare. It ranges from the precolonial period, through the time of the British, Portuguese, Belgian and German Empires, to conflicts in the region during the independence and Cold War eras. It seeks to give a picture of the cultures of these countries, and their political, social and economic conditions, today. There is a particular focus on interactions between nations, and issues of migration and trans­border initiatives. South Africa has a central place in the course but attention will particularly be given to Mozambique, Angola, Zimbabwe, Namibia and the 'Copperbelt' region of northern Zambia and Katanga/Shaba.

CORE 163C, The Caribbean
The archipelago of islands and mainland nations called the Caribbean constitutes a complex montage of races, ethnic groups, languages, and nations. Stretching from Guyana in South America to as far north as the Bahamas, minutes from the coast of Miami, the region is joined by a common history of slavery, imperialism, and resistant self-definition. This course studies literature, film, and music of the region to trace a socio-cultural history of the Caribbean. What are the continued effects of slavery and imperialism on the Caribbean? How does African-Creole culture in particular respond to these continued effects? How do tourism, advertising, music, and film inform/construct people’s relationship to the Caribbean in the global present?

CORE 165C, China
China has the distinction of being one of the world’s oldest continuous cultures, with 5,000 years of rich, complex history. Today, it is also a rising international power with the second largest economy on the globe. CORE 165C approaches China not as a monolithic entity, but as a complicated place and people best understood through diverse perspectives, including but not limited to history, economics, geography, literature, art, politics, environment, society, ethnicity, gender, migration, and diaspora. Students also gain indispensable research skills as they develop their own projects.

CORE 167C, Japan
Engages in dialogue with popular discourses, scholarly literature, and primary information sources of Japan and those who live in the island nation state. Focuses on key social and cultural issues that characterize contemporary Japan while also paying attention to its historical experiences and traditions that variably shape the present. Examines such topics as changing ‘western’ views on the Japanese, diversity in Japanese society, socio-demographic challenges, literature and religion, Japanese political economy and globalization, societal response to natural disasters, and popular culture. Employs a wide range of learning methods, including lecture, class discussion, films, hands-on experiences (e.g., calligraphy), and intensive projects which require students to collect, analyze, and synthesize a wide range of scholarly and non-scholarly sources. Ultimately aims to nurture students’ ability to understand and empathize with the logic (and illogic), experiences and emotions of the Japanese people; that is to say, to understand them as you would understand yourselves.

CORE 171C, Mexico
An interdisciplinary introduction to the history, people, art and cultures of Mexico, a country of diverse ethnic, sexual, gendered, class, and political identities that shares a 2,000-mile border with the United States. How does Mexico’s colonial past inform the present? On what terms has a Mexican national identity been defined and who is included or excluded from rights and citizenship? Objectives are to examine Mexico’s complex history and social fabric; to study Mexican identities, politics, and cultural expressions with relation to this history; and to gain a general understanding of contemporary Mexico in the context of current events and Mexico’s relationship to the United States.

CORE 173C, Ethiopia
Surveys the culture, religion, communities, history, and socio-economic developments of Ethiopia from the ancient times to the modern period. Ethiopia is home to over 80 ethnic groups with striking cultures that are distinct from Western traditions. Major themes include peoples and languages; traditional customs and beliefs; Christianity and Islam; marriages; community service organizations; literature, novels; education; ethnic relations; traditional art and music; colonial resistance; sports; socio-economic developments; natural resources usage; Ethiopia and Europe; the Ethiopian revolution; Ethiopian immigrants in the United States; traditional harmful practices; and politics. Emphasis is also given to contemporary issues. Lectures are supplemented by discussions, film presentation, group activity, and coffee ceremony.

CORE 176C, North American Indians
Provides an overview of North American Indians by drawing on case studies from four groupings: New England tribes; Iroquois; Cheyenne; and Pueblos. These cultures are studied in terms of their historical and political relationship to Anglo-American society and institutions, attending to Native Americans' resistance to attempted conquest by European or American powers, the creation of reservation systems, and the use of institutions (e.g., the Bureau of Indian Affairs, schools, missions) to change Native American cultures. Students also examine the response of Native Americans to outside pressures. Students explore other issues, such as sovereignty, identity, gambling, repatriation, land claims, and education, and their impact on North American Indians. Videotapes and Native American artifacts are studied throughout the semester.

CORE 177C, Peru
The Latin American country Peru evokes dramatic and conflicting images of spectacular natural settings, ancient ruins, cosmopolitan cities, shantytowns, street children, poverty and more. It is a country of extremes. This course offers an interdisciplinary inquiry into this ecologically and culturally diverse land. The course begins by exploring the distinct geography and ecology of the central Andean region (rainforest, mountains, desert, and ocean) in order to understand how these features have shaped the societies that inhabit the region of present-day Peru. This involves analyzing the evolution and organization of Pre-Columbian societies, paying special attention to the Inca civilization. It also examines the ideologies, institutions and practices introduced with the Spanish conquest and era of colonialism in order to understand their impact on indigenous society and their relevance to the state of underdevelopment that characterizes contemporary Peru. Study of present-day Peru juxtaposes rural and urban life, the ties between the two spheres, and the crisis conditions that enveloped both ways of life until recently. Specific issues include the internal armed conflict, the coca culture and cocaine economy, shantytowns and land invasions, oil extraction and indigenous resistance, among other compelling issues. Throughout the term, this course emphasizes the many paradoxes of this intriguing land.

CORE 180C, French Caribbean
Martinique, a 400 square-mile island, is an official part of France today despite being 4200 miles away from mainland France. French is the official language but most Martinicans freely express themselves in Creole. The majority of Martinicans will declare that they are, first and foremost, citizens of the French Republic, but will also readily admit that they are Martinican by culture. What is striking about Martinique is the dizzying array of cultural signifiers that seem to coexist in a veritable braided community, in which it can be genuinely difficult to tell where one cultural identity strand ends and another begins. Martinique is thus a fabulous lens through which this process of negotiating and renegotiating of cultures, languages, and identities can be viewed, and can be considered a precursor to modern-day globalization.

CORE 183C, The Middle East
A multi-disciplinary introduction both to the region conventionally referred to as the Middle East, and also to the academic discipline of Middle Eastern Studies. In other words, it is a study of the people, religion, history, and culture of the region, and also about the politics of studying that region. One of the presuppositions is that a careful, rigorous, and critical study of cultural studies can help one understand one’s own assumptions, presuppositions, etc. Among the topics students examine are the multiple interpretations of religion, including sects within Islam, that exist in the region; a variety of cultural practices and various languages; and the effect of imperialism and colonialism on the area. Readings include what current native commentators are saying on cultural, economic, and social debates.

CORE 190C, South Africa
Aims to provide students with an overview of the social, cultural, political, and economic dynamics that have shaped life in South Africa. Students and faculty work together to better understand the way in which the country of South Africa came into being, how that national identity has been a site of struggle and contestation, particularly in the case of the struggle to overcome Apartheid, and how South Africans are working to overcome the legacy of racism and oppression that has marked much of the social and cultural experience of South Africa. In doing so, students investigate the changing dynamics of race, gender, and culture in South Africa, with a particular focus on understanding the ways South Africans are actively reshaping and unsettling existing social identities and distinctions.

CORE 198C, Cuba
Examines the complex geographic, historic, social, racial, literary, political, and artistic fabric of Cuba. Historical readings explore major themes of Cuban history, while literary and personal narratives provide insight into social and political realities. These themes are complemented by a study of Cuban film, dance and music as agents of identity formation.

FSEM 111, China
China in Relation, From Dao to Mao to Now

Faculty Profile for Professor Crespi

Explores the theme of Chinese relations: not international diplomacy, and certainly not your brother-in-law from Zhengzhou, but the creative forms and patterns through which Chinese people have imagined and reimagined their connections to the cosmos, one another, and the rest of the world. Our approach is interdisciplinary, chronological, and self-reflective. It is interdisciplinary in that students engage with philosophy, poetry, fiction, graphic art, language, film, and more. In terms of chronology, students start in antiquity and make our way by carefully chosen leaps and bounds from the works of Confucius, up through Maoist propaganda films, and into the issues facing China today. The course is self-reflective because from beginning to end you are asked to think about your own cultural assumptions, as well as your own connections to China—a task of crucial importance given China’s unprecedented and growing influence on global economics, politics, and the environment.

Alongside its specific content, this first-year seminar introduces college-level standards of critical reading, written composition, oral presentation, and research methodology. Assignments—from one-page responses to a final research project—aim for step-by-step enhancement of the thinking and expressive skills that will support you through four years at Colgate and beyond. Students who successfully complete this seminar will receive credit for CORE 165C and satisfy the Communities & Identities core requirement.

John A. Crespi is the Henry R. Luce Associate of Chinese. His research interests center upon Chinese literature and culture, with particular focus on modern poetry and the art of the cartoon.

FSEM 112, The Iroquois
Faculty Profile for Professor Vecsey

During this semester we shall examine the archaeology, culture, history, economics, religion, literature, arts, politics, law, and individual lives of the Iroquois (Haudenosaunee) Indians -- Colgate’s closest Native American neighbors -- from the period before European contact to the present day. We shall place Iroquois experiences in North American Indian contexts (comparing the Iroquois, e.g., to the Cherokee), especially regarding the loss and persistence of tribal sovereignty; and we shall investigate Iroquois relations with New York State and the United States, especially in regard to competing land claims. On Saturday, October 20 we shall spend the day at the Native American Arts and Culture Festival in the Sanford Field House at Colgate. Artist demonstrations will include pottery, stone sculpture, lacrosse stick making, and interactive performances by the Haudenosaunee Singers and Dancers. Students who successfully complete this seminar will receive credit for CORE 188C and satisfy the Communities & Identities core requirement.

Christopher Vecsey is Harry Emerson Fosdick Professor of the Humanities, Native American Studies, and Religion. His most recent book (2012), Native Footsteps Along the Path of Saint Kateri Tekakwitha, examines the life of the seventeenth-century Mohawk convert to Catholicism and the devotions to her by Native American Catholics today.

FSEM 113, Japan
Faculty Profile for Professor Mehl

Formerly known primarily for an extraordinarily vital economy, Japan today is best known abroad, probably, for cultural exports such as manga, anime, sushi, and J-pop. The phenomenon of Japan's "soft power" has much to do with ideas and preconceptions about Japaneseness, and in this course we will subject those ideas to a searching analysis. Through a close examination of, for example, Japanese literary texts; image-based works such as manga, anime, film, and painting; Japanese material culture; and primary and scholarly materials by scholars of Japanese studies, this course will help students lay a foundation for scholarly work on Japan. Students will also gain indispensable research and writing skills as they develop their own projects. Students who successfully complete this seminar will receive credit for CORE 167C and satisfy the Communities & Identities core requirement.

Scott Mehl's published research articles and translations focus on the connections between Japanese literature and other literary traditions. His teaching areas include Japanese literature and Japanese popular culture (such as manga and anime).

Courses - Scientific Perspectives

View all with day/time information
CORE 110S, Discovering Biology
This course examines the major questions that have informed human understanding of the living world over the past 150 years. Begins with perhaps the oldest biological question of all: why are there so many living things? Shows how Charles Darwin's brilliant answer forms the foundation for much of modern biology. By following the path of discovery leading from Darwin, students learn about a devout monk named Gregor Mendel, a feisty chemist named Louis Pasteur, and two brash young scientists named Watson and Crick. Explores the great diversity of life and how organisms adapt and change. The approach is student-active and hands-on; students work together to unravel a few of the mysteries of life. Intended for those who are interested in biology but probably will not choose to major in the life sciences.

CORE 120S, Earth Resources
Management of the Earth's energy, mineral, and water resources is a subject of ongoing controversy and debate. This debate revolves around two related issues: the diminishing supply of some resources and the environmental cost of resource extraction and energy production. This course examines the origin and geologic setting of Earth's resources, and how these factors influence resource exploration, extraction, and use. Environmental and economic aspects of resource extraction are explored. Students examine the public debate about resource management and conservation, as well as the roles of politics and the media in shaping this debate. This course emphasizes student-led discussions of case studies dealing with current resource-related topics. The purpose of this course is to create a framework in which resource issues can be evaluated, integrating the scientific and social issues inherent in resource development.

CORE 124S, Cells & Human Development
The fusion of sperm and egg cells to form a single-celled zygote is the initial step in development in most multi-cellular organisms. In humans, repeated divisions of this single fertilized egg are responsible for the production of more than 70 trillion cells of greater than 200 different types. In this course students examine how a fertilized egg undergoes division, how the stem cells produced by these divisions become "determined" to form cells of particular types, and how these determined cells finally differentiate into the highly specialized cells that make up most tissues and organs. As this process is examined, students also explore the relationship between cells and developmental patterns, and investigate how genetic and environmental factors can influence (and alter) cell fate. Biological, social, and ethical aspects of the human manipulation of development are also considered, including examination of such topics as cloning by nuclear transfer, reproductive technology, fetal surgery, stem cells, and embryonic gene therapy.

CORE 170S, Media Effects
Uses a social scientific approach to examine the effects that media exposure has on audience members. Students develop an understanding of how the media affects audience members' physiology, cognition, beliefs, attitudes, affective states, and behavior. Key media topics studied include violence, sex, politics, and portrayals of groups. Key types of media studied include television, music, video games, and social media.

CORE 177S, Crit Analy of Hlth Issues:AIDS
Examines a key global health issue, such as AIDS or Cancer, from an interdisciplinary approach. The readings introduce students to the history, politics, science, and public health issues of the disease. Students will examine the epidemiology of the disease, examining how geography, socioeconomic status, and other factors influence transmission and treatment, and statistical measures used to analyze data about causes, cures and spread of disease will be introduced. Finally, the impacts of the disease on communities at different scales will be examined.

CORE 179S, An Unequal World
Social inequality affects us all. This course will explore what the science of social psychology tells us about how social inequality shapes the ways we think, live, and die. Because social inequality is about the relative status of people based on their group memberships, we will begin the course by exploring social psychological theories that help explain the centrality of our group memberships to our identity. As we will see, these group memberships can be based on many different aspects of our identity: race, gender, socioeconomic status, among many others. Next, we will explore what experimental data tell us about the sources of, and consequences of, group-based disparities. In particular, we will examine the roles of limited resources, identity, power, morality, and prejudice in perpetuating inequality. Finally, we will discuss the emerging literature on how to coexist more peacefully in an unequal world.

CORE 181S, Cooperation & the Environment
Cooperation is the key to understanding many environmental problems and policies. When and how do humans cooperate with each other to solve environmental issues? What features make that cooperation easier or harder, and what can we do to encourage cooperation? This course explores the origins of cooperation from an economic, biological, psychological, and social perspective, with a particular focus on game theory. This knowledge is then applied to a variety of environmental issues, ranging from climate change to overfishing to the hole in the ozone layer.

CORE 183S, The Science Fiction Effect
Combines popular science writing with works of science fiction in order to interrogate the ways in which science is presented, expressed, and translated into texts intended for laypeople. Students will consider the role both kinds of work play in shaping public scientific literacy. Readings will include essays from Best American Science Writing, recently published nonfiction in the genre of popular science, assorted recent articles, as well as seminal and contemporary works of literary science fiction. Students will gain a deeper understanding of how science is practiced and written about today, as well as the ways in which fiction about scientific advances popularizes the science it addresses. Given what we learn through reading nonfiction, is fictional writing about real science a fruitful part of public scientific discourse?

FSEM 126, The Biology of Women
The Biology of Women: Sex, Gender, Reproduction, and Disease

Faculty Profile for Professor Van Wynsberghe

A basic understanding of the biological differences between men and women, and the implications of these findings is essential in today’s world that contains both modern technologies and, in some circles, steadfast gender-based stereotypes. This course investigates the historical and environmental construction of gender, the biological aspects of sex, the unique characteristics of female anatomy and reproduction, and the effect of sexually transmitted diseases and cancer on female health. Through laboratory activities and written, oral, and visual presentations students will explore the scientific methods used to acquire our current understanding of hormonal signaling, genetic inheritance, microbial pathogenesis, and cell biology that underlie these topics. Social and ethical issues that exist and are raised by the biological differences between males and females will also be discussed, including hormonal therapy, in vitro fertilization, prenatal genetic testing, female genital mutilation, and the use of birth control to prevent AIDS transmission. Students who successfully complete this seminar will satisfy their Scientific Perspectives core requirement. Students who successfully complete this seminar will receive credit for CORE 172S and satisfy the Scientific Perspective core requirement.

Priscilla Van Wynsberghe is assistant professor of biology with a background in molecular genetics and microbiology. Her research investigates how genetic pathways, composed of small RNAs and proteins, regulate development of the nematode C. elegans.

FSEM 128, Sex, Drugs, and Chocolate
Faculty Profile for Professor Frey

This course explores the many tasty, interesting, mystical, and illegal uses of plants. Starting with a framework for understanding the origin of plant products and basic genetics, we shift to a thorough discussion of human-plant interactions. Students will help develop the topics covered, and it is common for us to investigate the following themes: agriculture, transgenic crops, and health consequences of pesticides (sex); the chemistry, pharmacology, and history of plants used in medicine and recreationally as drugs, including issues concerning the ownership of genetic stock material, bio-prospecting and the development of new pharmaceuticals (drugs); and, the history of chocolate and its intersection with religion and mysticism, ethical issues involved in the production of chocolate, and understanding why we like chocolate so much. Evaluation will primarily be based on a series of papers, class discussions, and class projects. Students who successfully complete this seminar will satisfy the Scientific Perspective core requirement.

Frank M. Frey, professor of biology and environmental studies, has research interests in ethnobotany and traditional medicine, environmental health in southwestern Uganda, the adaptive nature of symmetry, and the genetic integration and adaptive nature of plant volatile emission, pigmentation, and reproductive traits. He has travelled with students to Australia, England, Uganda, and Wales, and maintains an active research laboratory involving many undergraduate students.

FSEM 131, From Paintings to Pixels
Faculty Profile for Professor Fourquet

From the beginning of history, art and technology have influenced each other. For example, during the Renaissance, Piero della Francesca, an artist-mathematician, and Leonardo da Vinci, an artist-engineer, made both scientific and artistic breakthroughs. The thread that links art and science, experiment and theory, is problem solving, which demands creativity and rigor.

This seminar introduces students to interdisciplinary thinking: they learn the elements of computer programming in the context of visual art, developing problem solving skills that bridge disciplines. Students formally analyze the visual structure of paintings to create abstractions, sketches and collages, which provide templates that structure the computer programs they write.

Through this interdisciplinary lens, students see how the principles of computer science respond naturally with other aspects of a liberal arts education, integrating today’s technology into the spirit of humanism. No prior programming experience is expected. Students who successfully complete this seminar will satisfy the Scientific Perspective core requirement.

Elodie Fourquet is an Assistant Professor in Computer Science with research expertise in Computer Graphics and Visual Perception. In both research and teaching the interdisciplinary aspect of the Computer Science field is key to her approach.

FSEM 132, Water
Faculty Profile for Professor Tseng

How does water technology impact our civilization from the ancient times to now? This course explores the water technologies and their evolution through time and how the technologies related to water distribution and treatment evolve with human’s understanding of and interaction with water. Through the lens of science and engineering, students will examine the role water plays in human health, the environment, and sustainability. The course covers topics on the application and limitation of scientific knowledge and broader impacts that technology has on history and current events. Students who successfully complete this seminar will receive credit for CORE 178S and satisfy the Scientific Perspective core requirement.

Water issues have always been a hot topic in Southern California, where Professor Linda Y. Tseng is from. Currently, she is continuing her research that focuses on wastewater and water quality.

FSEM 133, Fire
Faculty Profile for Professor Levy

Fire is the quintessential human technology. It is also a potent symbol whose meaning has become central to our national and community discourse. Fire is the at the root of countless traditions, myths, and foodways, and through controlled combustion of fossil fuels, fire has grown to be the central process at the heart of modern industrial and agricultural systems. This course will explore where the energy in combustion comes from, how humans harness that energy to do work, and how cultural perceptions of fire influence the choices individuals and societies make about what resources to burn, where to burn them, and what to do with the waste products. The course will focus on in-class laboratory investigations of combustion, field trips to local fire-related sites, and discussion of the costs, benefits, and consequences of building a civilization on a foundation of fire. Students who successfully complete this seminar will receive credit for CORE 184S and satisfy the Scientific Perspective core requirement.

Joe Levy is an Assistant Professor of geology whose research focuses on understanding how Earth’s surface is shaped by climate processes and how we can read the record of climate change in the landforms climate processes leave behind. He specializes in polar and planetary science, exploring the compositions and chemistry of permafrost in Antarctica, Alaska, Mars, and beyond, through field sampling campaigns, satellite mapping, and lab investigations of dirt, rock, ice, and water.

FSEM 136, The Unreliable Internet
Faculty Profile for Professor Gember-Jacobson

In our hyperconnected world, we expect the Internet, and its abundance of information, entertainment, social networking, e-commerce, and more, to always be accessible. Our expectations are usually satisfied thanks to a complex system of cables, specialized devices, and software. However, this infrastructure is susceptible to human error, cyber attacks, and censorship that compromise our ability to access (parts of) the Internet. In this course, we’ll examine how the Internet works and the ways in which it can malfunction or restrict access to content. Through a combination of readings, lecture, discussion, and experiments, we’ll explore flaws and limitations in the Internet’s design, and we’ll consider a variety of technology- and policy-based solutions for making the Internet more reliable and open. Students who successfully complete this seminar will satisfy the Scientific Perspective core requirement.

Aaron Gember-Jacobson is an assistant professor of computer science specializing in computer networks. His research fuses ideas from networking, machine learning, and formal methods to make computer networks more reliable.

FSEM 138, Artful Brain: Neuro-aesthetics
The Artful Brain: An Exploration in Neuroaesthetics

Faculty Profile for Professor Hansen

This seminar will consist of an exploration in the aesthetic experience of visual art as it relates to the sensory and perceptual mechanisms of the brain. Many of the topics discussed in this seminar are centered on the view that the function of art and the function of the visual brain are one and the same. We will thus consider that the aims of the artist in rendering a particular piece of art essentially constitute an extension of the processes of the visual brain. By taking this point of view (through an introductory understanding of the sensory and perceptual processes of the visual brain) we will discuss possible outlines of a theory of aesthetics that is neurologically based. Students who successfully complete this seminar will receive credit for CORE 111S and satisfy the Scientific Perspectives core requirement.

Bruce Hansen is associate professor of psychology and neuroscience. He has published numerous articles in the field of visual perception and cognition.

FSEM 140, Mind & Brain in Meditation
Faculty Profile for Professor Braaten

Meditation, zazen, ch’an, dhyana: These are all words for the ancient practice of mindful sitting. This simple practice has endured for millennia, and has thrived in a wide variety of cultures, including, most recently, the West. To the Western mind, this practice of “doing nothing” is full of paradox. Students will explore the practice, both academically and experientially. Students will study the psychological effects on concentration, memory, consciousness, and psychological well-being. Students will seek explanations from research on mind, brain, and behavior, for how “doing nothing” can have such profound effects. Students will sit regularly in meditation, and will use ourselves as subjects of our own research on the effects of meditation. This course should give students a better understanding of psychology, scientific research, and meditation, and no previous experience with any of these is necessary to fully participate in the course. Students who successfully complete this seminar will receive credit for CORE 145S and satisfy the Scientific Perspective core requirement.

Professor Braaten is interested broadly in consciousness and cognition, with a special focus on mindfulness and meditation.

FSEM 141, Willpower: Sci of Self-Control
Faculty Profile for Professor Conti

Willpower allows people to delay gratification, resist temptations, and reach challenging long-term goals. Our ability to control our will influences nearly every area of our lives. This course is designed to be a unique opportunity to engage in this fascinating topic from a scientific perspective. Students will begin by sharing their own experiences with trying to exert willpower. Students will then explore psychological theories of self-control and then read the scientific research that supports and extends these theories. As a way of deepening understanding of this literature and developing our writing skills, students will keep a journal as they read. In addition, students will actually do some of this science. Together, we will attempt to replicate and extend a study from the literature. Doing so will engage the class in every stage of the scientific process and show, first hand, how research works. Students who successfully complete one of these seminars will satisfy the Scientific Perspectives core requirement.

Regina Conti’s research investigates motivational processes in school, work, health, and family contexts. Most recently, she is exploring how the motivational dynamics of family life are influenced by a diagnosis of autism in a child. She finds that as parents adjust to the diagnosis, their parenting goals shift in the direction of compassion, which allows them to be more in tune with the unique needs of their child.

FSEM 142, Mathematics and Policy Making
Faculty Profile for Professor Christensen

Students will explore parts of the history and the role of mathematics in society. While its early uses were among philosophers and religious practitioners, we will focus on its role as a tool in policy making. In particular students will investigate if there are mathematical/statistical reasons for the emphasis on education in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. Students will develop elementary statistical tools needed for our analysis, and through projects students will develop criteria that can be tested with statistical tools in order to decide if STEM education is really as important as we are made to believe. We all have different ideas of what makes something important, and this means that there is a great deal of flexibility when formulating projects. Students will define their own criteria for how important STEM fields are and will test those criteria using statistical techniques. Students who successfully complete this seminar will satisfy the Scientific Perspectives core requirement.

Jens Christensen is an Associate Professor of Mathematics at Colgate University. His research is in wavelet and signal analysis, and it sits at the interface of analysis, algebra and geometry. Techniques from this area of research finds uses in cell phones, image compression and music analysis.

FSEM 144, Introduction to Statistics
Faculty Profile for Professor Lantz

Introduces students to statistical thinking by examining data collected to solve real-world problems. A wide range of applications are considered. Topics include experimental design, descriptive statistics, the normal curve, correlation and regression, probability theory, sampling, the central limit theorem, estimation, hypothesis testing, paired observations, and the chi-square test. Particular emphasis is given to the models that underlie statistical inference. Students who successfully complete this seminar will receive credit for CORE 143S and satisfy the Scientific Perspective core requirement.

David Lantz received his bachelor's in the secondary education of mathematics at Kutztown State College, and his master's and Ph.D. in mathematics at the University of Kansas. He has taught at Colgate since 1977 and written or co-authored over 30 papers in the field of commutative algebra.

FSEM 199, The Air Up There
OPEN TO BENTON SCHOLARS ONLY

Faculty Profile for Professor Levine

Weather and climate command our attention because they deeply affect life on Earth, in ways both ordinary and extraordinary. Life on Earth also affects weather and climate, now more profoundly than ever, and with vitally important scientific, political, cultural, and ethical implications. This seminar examines what we know and don't know about the atmosphere, exploring its motion and moisture, its temperature and transparency, and its make-up and break-down. It also investigates the limitations of science and efforts to predict weather and climate.

Because of the atmosphere's impact on our lives, this seminar also investigates how science interacts with other human endeavors. To what extent does fore-knowledge of atmospheric events such as hurricanes and tornadoes allow people to make wise decisions? How does the science of global warming intersect with the politics and ethics of this issue? What kinds of questions are amenable to scientific investigation, and what kinds of questions are not?

Students in this seminar will cultivate a better understanding of the atmosphere, weather phenomena, the greenhouse effect, global climate change, and the power and limitations of scientific inquiry. Students will share and strengthen their knowledge through written, oral, and visual presentations. Students who successfully complete this seminar will receive credit for CORE 166S and satisfy the Scientific Perspective core requirement.

Jonathan Levine is a planetary physicist whose research seeks to understand the history of the Solar System. He is part of a team seeking to build a novel kind of mass spectrometer capable of dating rocks, with the aim of flying on a future space mission to the Moon or Mars.

Global Engagements

Courses in this component provide the opportunity to analyze the conditions and consequences of human diversity in its local and transnational forms. To satisfy this requirement, each student will successfully complete a designated course that inquires into the ways that people seek to make sense of a diverse and increasingly interconnected world. Global Engagements (GE) courses come from departments and programs throughout the university, and they take a variety of forms. For instance, a course in this component might ask students to do one of the following:
  • examine the consequences of globalization in one or more of its many forms,
  • investigate issues or processes that have an impact that can be fully understood only by using a global perspective,
  • experience the cross-cultural understanding that comes from intensive language learning or study group participation,
  • cross boundaries by examining how diversity finds expression in human culture, or
  • consider human diversity in dimensions such as race, class, and gender.

Ultimately, the GE requirement seeks to empower students to live responsibly in contexts that require an understanding of the complexity of human beings and their impact, whether in the United States or in the broader world.

A Global Engagements course may count toward a student’s major or minor; it may also fulfill an Area of Inquiry requirement. The requirement must be completed prior to graduation.

Global Engagements courses will be identified in the registration materials available each semester. Use the Core Area dropdown box on the course offerings page or click "View All" below.

Courses - Global Engagements

View all with day/time information
CHIN 121, Elementary Chinese I
This introduction to modern standard Chinese emphasizes understanding and speaking, with practice in reading and writing approximately 300 characters in either traditional or simplified forms. It covers basic structural patterns and vocabulary needed for ordinary conversation as well as future development.

CHIN 201, Intermediate Chinese I
Offers continued training in Modern Standard Chinese, with emphasis on reading and writing skills. Grammar review is combined with introduction to variations in speech and writing. Recitation and conversation sessions, role-play, and skits reinforce listening and speaking ability. By the end of the year, students may expect to communicate in both speech and writing on everyday topics.

CHIN 222, China thru Literature & Film
Offers an introduction to representative works of Chinese literature in English translation, as well as works of Chinese film with English subtitles. Specific focus and selections vary from year to year. No knowledge of Chinese is expected.

FSEM 145, Gender and Social Justice
Faculty Profile for Professor Simonson

In this course, we will explore gender, as it is understood and enacted by different people in various historical moments, geographical locations, and cultural contexts, focusing particularly on the way gender intersects with race, ethnicity, class, religion, sexuality, ability, and other markers of identity. We will think critically about oppression, activism, social change, and common assumptions about the world and people around us. One of our main goals in this course is to explore both the forces that feed into inequality and discrimination, and ways to resist, challenge, and overcome those forces. We will ask questions about bodies, work, families, identity, politics, medicine, history, and the media; our inquiries will largely be based in the United States, but we will also think about women’s movements and situations around the world. We will develop the vocabulary and tools to speak and think critically about oppression, patriarchy, and some of the issues that face us as both females and males today. This course will require sensitivity, respect, and substantial work in the form of reading, writing, and above all thinking. Students who successfully complete this seminar will receive course credit for WMST 202 and fulfill the Global Engagement requirement.

Mary Simonson’s research interests include film music, American cinema and entertainment in the first half of the twentieth century, and filmed dance. Her teaching and scholarship focus on representations and performances of gender and sexuality on the stage and the screen.

FSEM 158, Global Bioethics and Religion
Faculty Profile for Professor Martin

The revolution in biotechnology has given humanity powers unimaginable a few decades ago. Bioethics examines moral and ethical dilemmas arising from the interface of human experience and emerging scientific advances in biology, medicine, and technology (human embryonic stem cell applications, cloning, genetic engineering, etc.). Global bioethics inquiry examines bioethics deliberations on the international stage, with a focused exploration of diverse and competing transnational theoretical debates. The course undertakes a critical study of comparative religious ethics and global bioethics issues within Judaism, Buddhism, Islam, Hinduism, and Christianity. Students who successfully complete this seminar will receive credit for RELG 265 and satisfy one half of the Human Thought and Expression area of inquiry requirement.

Clarice Martin is Professor of Philosophy and Religion. Her research focuses on Christian Origins in the Early and Late Antique Mediterranean; Global Bioethics and Religion; and Religion in the Genetic Age.

FSEM 163, LGBTQ Cinema/Transnational
Faculty Profile for Professor Maitra

How is cinema queer? Cinema’s fascination with same-sex desire is as old as cinema itself. The 1930 Hollywood film _Morocco_, for instance, shocked audiences because its “straight” female lead—a glamorous cabaret singer—finishes her opening number by kissing another female character. But alongside the emergence of a global LGBTQ movement over the last three decades, cinema has traveled far beyond innuendos, becoming a powerful and popular medium for queer visibility and self-expression. In fact, cinema has played a crucial role in making queer politics and identities transnational and global. In this class, we will explore these cinematic (and other) attributes of queerness through a rich variety of films from Asia, Europe, and North America, paying close attention to their social and political contexts. This course will introduce students to the basics of film analysis and a global archive of queer cinema. We will also learn to critically examine Euro-American LGBTQ politics through the transnational representations of race, ethnicity, class, and religion in many of these films. Students who successfully complete this seminar will receive course credit for a 200-level FMST class, the Global Engagements CORE requirement, and for one half of the Human Thought and Expression area of inquiry requirement. Students who successfully complete this seminar will receive credit for FMST 230 and satisfy the Global Engagements requirements.

Professor Maitra's research interests include transnational film and media, queer politics, and Marxist aesthetics. He is currently watching and eager to chat about _Sense8_. He is also finishing a book on identity as a "media effect" in a capitalist economy.

GERM 201, Intermediate German I
Completes the presentation of basic structures of German and helps students develop greater facility and sophistication in using these structures - in comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Continue the exploration of German cultures begun on the 100 level.

GREK 122, Elementary Classical Greek II
The second semester of an introductory study of the elements of the Greek language. A thorough and methodical approach to the basics is supplemented, as students progress, by selected readings of works by ancient authors.

HIST 218, African Amer Struggle-Freedom
Surveys the presence of African Americans in the United States and their struggle for freedom under the concept of democracy. Examines African origins, the Middle Passage, the creation of an African American culture in slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the growth of black communities in the face of hostility, the African American impact on American culture, the Civil Rights movement, and the continuing struggle by African Americans to make democracy real. (US)

JAPN 201, Intermediate Japanese I
The first semester of intermediate-level study of Japanese, this course completes the presentation of basic structures of the language. There is continued emphasis on oral communication, with practice in reading simple texts and acquisition of an additional 500 Chinese characters by the end of the term.

POSC 216, Comparative Pol: Latin America
Today Latin America is one of the most democratic regions of the developing world, although it faces problems of inequality, gridlock, and economic growth. Latin America's 20th-century experiences of coups, revolutions, and instability also present important lessons for comparative politics. This course introduces students to the countries of Latin America and the important patterns of similarity and difference that can help them understand political development and elucidate comparative trends. Regime type is one prism through which students examine the region's countries, including democracy, semi-democracy, and various authoritarian regimes, especially bureaucratic authoritarianism. Another important topic is the United States' relationship with the region's polities, on issues like the Cold War, drug wars, and economic policies. In addition to big countries like Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Colombia, and Venezuela, the course also focuses on countries of particular student interest. (CO)

RELG 240, Religion and Terrorism
Terrorists are often driven by extremist beliefs staunchly rooted in religious, racial, and ethical rationales for torture, violence, and genocide. The course provides a theoretical and empirical understanding, and explanation of terrorism. While tracing the history of terrorism to the ancient West, students will also identify various analytical approaches to the study of terrorism, recognize terrorist groups, and review terrorist tactics. Students will examine the ways that states counter terror, and the choices and the tradeoffs states face when confronting terrorism. Students will examine terrorist individuals and groups in Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Judaism, Islam, and Sikhism such as the Ku Klux Klan, Timothy Mc Veigh, Republican Army in Ireland, Orthodox Rabbi Meir Kahane, Dr. Baruch Goldstein, Osama bin Laden, Boko Haram, Islamic State, and Shoko Asahara in Japan.

RELG 265, Global Bioethics and Religion
The revolution in biotechnology has given humanity powers unimaginable a few decades ago. Bioethics within the Western cultural tradition examines moral and ethical dilemmas arising from the interface of human experience and advances in biology, medicine, and technology (human embryonic stem cell applications, cloning, genetic engineering, euthanasia, etc.). Global bioethical inquiry places moral and ethical bioethics deliberations on the international stage, with a focused exploration of diverse and competing transnational theoretical debates. The course undertakes a critical study of comparative religious ethics and global bioethics issues within Judaism, Buddhism, Islam, Hinduism, and Christianity.

SPAN 202, Intermed Spanish: Lang & Lit
Continues to improve the student’s ability to understand, speak, read, and write Spanish and emphasizes development of reading comprehension. It includes a review of the more difficult points of intermediate grammar and focuses on the acquisition of skills necessary for the study of literature. Vocabulary study, conversational practice, and short compositions based on readings are included. Instructors will determine eligibility of students with more than 3 or 4 years of secondary school Spanish following review of language background. Language Placement Guidelines

SPAN 353, Span Lit: Mod Spain in Crisis
Beginning with the loss of the empire in the 19th century and moving through a series of political upheavals, including civil war and fascism, the history of modern Spain has been one of turmoil and continual conflict. The numerous political crises resulted in larger crises of a social, spiritual, and moral nature. Questions of national identity, generational gaps, and gender, as they appear in Spanish literature from the late 19th century to the present day, are the focus of this course. Readings include works of prose, theater, and poetry drawn from a range of literary movements, and emphasis is placed on the socio-historical context and its relationship with literary innovation. Language Placement Guidelines

SPAN 355, Latin Amer Lit: Many Voices
The course explores the diversity of literary voices in Latin America, from pre-Columbian texts to the contemporary writings of Castellanos, Rulfo, and García Márquez. This survey introduces students to the most important developments in Latin American literary history as it examines questions of cultural, ethnic, gender, and class identities. Language Placement Guidelines

WMST 202, Intro to Women's Studies
Explores gender from a variety of angles, and in tandem with race, ethnicity, class, religion, sexuality, and other markers of identity. Students develop vocabulary and tools to speak and think critically about oppression, patriarchy, social change, and common assumptions about the world and people around us. A primary goal is to explore both the forces that feed into inequality and discrimination, and ways to resist, challenge, and overcome those forces. Students explores issues ranging from bodies, work, families, identity, politics, medicine, history, and the media, as well as the ways in which feminist movements around the world have addressed these topics.