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Self-Help/Home Care

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Stomach Illness

The stomach virus is highly contagious but usually goes away quickly and on its own.

Watch out for symptoms of dehydration such as
- Not urinating
- Dry mouth and swollen tounge
- Crying without tears
- Fever over 102
- Weakness
- Dizziness
- Confusion
- Fainting

Contact the main health center for an appointment. 

Remedies
1) Liquids- Try clear liquids like water and broth, sports drinks to replace electrolytes and peppermint or ginger tea to calm your stomach
2) Massage your P-6 pressure point to reduce nausea.  Measure the width of three fingers down from the bottom of your palm and you’ll feel a sensitive spot between two tendons. 
3) Rest- Give your body enough energy to fight the virus
4) If you are having trouble keeping liquids down try taking small sips or chewing ice chips
5) Skip the over the counter medications- the best treatment for the stomach virus is time
6) Reintroduce food after you can keep down liquids.  It is important to replace your nutrients after vomiting.

            - Bananas replace lost nutrients and strengthen the lining of your stomach
            - Applesauce is easy to digest and can help with diarrhea
            - Rice provides energy and is easy on a sensitive stomach
            - White toast is binding

6) The last foods to reintroduce are

            - Dairy
            - Fiber
            - Spicy foods
            - Salty foods
            - Caffeine
            - Alcohol


The common cold

Symptoms 
General body aches, chills, fever less than 101° F, fatigue, rundown feeling, headache, sneezing, nasal congestion, runny nose, sore throat, difficulty swallowing, dry & hacking cough, cough bringing up mucus. If you have symptoms of the common could for less than 4-6 days, you probably do not need medical attention. 

Unfortunately, there is no cure for the common cold. Upper respiratory infections or colds are an inflammation of the upper respiratory tract caused by many different viral strains.  Colds are spread mainly through droplet infection through kissing, sneezing, coughing, and contaminated hands.  Colds may last in diminishing severity for two to four weeks.  They cannot be cured by antibiotics.  However, over-the-counter medications may reduce your symptoms.

Remedies

1)     Get plenty of fluids- It helps break up your congestion, keeps your throat moist and prevents you from getting dehydrated
2)     Take a hot shower- You can loosen up a stuffy nose by breathing in steam
3)     Blow your nose- It’s better to get it out than keep it in. Try using a first aid ointment after to prevent your nostrils from getting raw.
4)     Use a saline spray
5)     Stay warm and well rested
6)     Gargle with warm salt water- It brings temporarily relief to a sore throat
7)     Drink hot liquids- They relieve congestion and soothe the inflamed lining of your nose and throat
8)     Put a warm washcloth on your sinuses
9)     Use cough drops with menthol- They will help numb your throat
10)   Place an extra pillow under your head- It will help relieve congested nasal passages

There may be a day or two when nothing seems to help.  But while common colds can make people feel terrible, you will begin to feel better soon!

To prevent the spread of the virus, cover your mouth during sneezing and coughing. Also, wash your hands, especially before handling food. Be courteous- viral illnesses can spread easily from person to person.

It is important to determine if you have a viral cold as opposed to a bacterial infection. 

Do you have...
 
 A rash, more than a mild earache, facial pain, a cough that produces green, brown, or bloody mucus, chest pain, a wheeze, a history of repeated strep throat, tuberculosis, rheumatic fever, rheumatic heart disease, kidney disease (excluding common urinary tract infection), asthma, or chronic bronchitis, cold symptoms that have persisted for more than four days without improvement, a fever of 101° F or more on each of the last three days, white or yellow patches on the back of your throat? Contact the main health center for an appointment.

If you have nasal congestion, do you also have...
A temperature of 101° F or higher that persists for more than two days, congestion that does not clear up within 2-3 weeks; a cough or sneeze which produces brown, green, or bloody mucus; tender or painful sinuses around the eyes. Contact the main health center for an appointment.
 
Medication for congestion
Pseudoephedrine (Found in Sudafed)
- Decongests nasal membranes by shrinking the blood vessels and swollen membranes. It will NOT make you drowsy because it does not contain an antihistamine. It may make you feel "hyper", though. Do not take before bed, switch to actifed or check with a doctor or nurse.

A Note about Antihistamines: Antihistamines often cause drowsiness and are often found in OTC products designed to relieve cold and allergy symptoms. Examples of antihistamines include diphenhydramine hydrochloride chlorpheniramine, and clemastine fumarate. CAUTION: Side effects include dizziness, nervousness, sleeplessness, and heart palpitations. Do NOT take with caffeine, other stimulants, or alcohol.

Sodium Chloride (Found in some nasal sprays, e.g., Nasal Moist)
- Used for dry nasal membranes caused by chronic sinusitis, dry air, allergies, and asthma. 
- If you choose to take a cold medication that treats multiple symptoms, it is helpful to know its ingredients. There are two main things to look out for with combination over-the-counter medications:

1. You may be treating symptoms you do not have when you take a combination medication. For example, Robitussin Maximum Strength Cough & Cold Liquid contains a decongestant and a cough suppressant. If you have a cough, but not a stuffy or runny nose, you would not need to take   this product.
2. You may not be getting enough of a particular active ingredient when you take a combination product (see examples below). -OR- You may overdose on an ingredient if you take a combination medication in conjunction with another drug. 


Cough

Different medications are used to relieve productive (mucus producing) and nonproductive (dry) coughs.  Make sure you are taking the correct medication or else you may be doing yourself more harm than good.

For productive coughs: 
-Try medicines such as Robitussin which have Guaifenesin as the active ingredient. They are cough expectorants which help loosen phlegm and thin bronchial secretions associated with a cough that is producing mucus. It is best not to suppress a productive cough as it helps the body clear its airways. CAUTION: Side effects are rare if taken as directed. Do not take if you have a chronic cough, asthma, emphysema, or excessive phlegm.

For nonproductive coughs:
- Try medicines such as Robitussin DM and Benylin DM which have Dextromethorphan as the active ingredient.  They are cough suppressants to calm a dry cough probably caused by minor throat and bronchial irritation. CAUTION: Side effects are rare if taken as directed. Do not take if you have a chronic cough, asthma, emphysema, or excessive phlegm.
- This does not mean, however, that you should take a suppressant for a mucus-producing cough all day. This will inhibit your body from coughing and clearing out mucus.

Combination cold medications 
- If you choose to take a cold medication that treats multiple symptoms, it is helpful to know its ingredients. There are two main things to look out for with combination over-the-counter medications:

1. You may be treating symptoms you do not have when you take a combination medication. For example, Robitussin Maximum Strength Cough & Cold Liquid contains a decongestant and a cough suppressant. If you have a cough, but not a stuffy or runny nose, you would not need to take this product.
2. You may not be getting enough of a particular active ingredient when you take a combination product (see examples below). -OR- You may overdose on an ingredient if you take a combination medication in conjunction with another drug. 

Remedies
1) Stay hydrated
2) Try lozenges with menthol
3) Drink warm tea with honey
4) Take a hot shower

Contact the main health center for an appointment.

Fever

If you have a fever, do you also have any of the following symptoms? 

A fever that is 101° F or higher and/or persists for more than two days; a fever that appears after recently starting a new medication, a fever that lasts more than two days; a fever that is accompanied by a rash, a severe headache or stiff neck, marked irritability or confusion, a cough with green or brown sputum, shortness of breath with a cough, severe back pain, abdominal pain, or painful urination, symptoms of dehydration (see more below).

Dehydration
Dehydration occurs when your body loses too much water. When you lose large amounts of fluids through diarrhea, vomiting, or sweating, the body cells reabsorb fluid from the blood and other body tissues. In more extreme cases, this could cause the blood vessels to collapse and lead to shock.

Early symptoms of dehydration:
Dry mouth and sticky saliva, reduced urine output with dark yellow urine.

Treatment of dehydration:
Treatment of dehydration involves stopping the fluid loss and gradually replacing lost fluids. It is important to control vomiting and diarrhea before consuming larger amounts of liquids. A rehydration drink, such as Pedialyte or Rehydralyte, can replace fluids and essential minerals called electrolytes.

Sports drinks, such as Gatorade or Poweraid, will replace fluid, but most contain too much sugar and not enough essential minerals. Plain water will provide fluid but not any necessary nutrients or electrolytes. 
Acetaminophen and Ibuprofen are the two major active ingredients that will help reduce fevers. Young adults should avoid taking aspirin for cold symptoms. Aspirin, which contains salicylates, has been implicated in the development of Reye Syndrome, an uncommon, but serious complication of viral illnesses, such as colds, in children and young adults.

- Acetaminophen (Found in Tylenol) -
used as an antipyretic (fever reducer) and an analgesic (pain reliever).
CAUTION: Side effects are rare if taken as directed.

- Ibuprofen (Found in Nuprin, Advil and Motrin) -
used as an antipyretic (fever reducer), analgesic (pain reliever), and anti-inflammatory medication. Generic ibuprofen is fine.
CAUTION: Side effects include stomach irritation; take with food, milk, or large amounts of water. Do not use if allergic to aspirin.

Contact the 
main health center for an appointment.

Sore Throat

If you have a sore throat, do you also have any of the following symptoms?

Pain with swallowing; labored or difficult breathing; a sore throat that develops after exposure to strep throat; a sore throat accompanied by chills; a fever of 102° F or higher, and a cough that produces green or yellow mucus; a rash that occurs with your sore throat; a mild sore throat that has lasted longer than two weeks; a sore throat that is not caused by a cold, allergy, smoking, overuse of your voice, or other irritation; hoarseness or enlarged lymph nodes that have persisted for more than 10 days; a sore throat that occurs with the typical signs of strep throat.
Most sore throats are caused by viruses and often accompany a cold. A mild sore throat is often due to low humidity or smoke. People with allergies or nasal congestion may breathe through their mouths while sleeping contributing to or causing a sore throat. However, it is important to rule out more serious causes of a sore throat, such as streptococcal bacteria (strep throat) and mononucleosis.

Most sore throats are viral in nature and cannot be treated by antibiotics. Strep throat is caused by a bacteria and should be treated by antibiotics. You can examine your own throat for signs of strep throat.

Symptoms of strep throat:

A sore throat that persists for three to four days, a fever of 101° F or higher, swollen glands in the neck, white or yellow patches on the tonsils or back of the throat, headache, mild upset stomach, rash

Examining your throat for signs of a strep infection:

Open your mouth wide and use a flashlight to see your throat and tonsils more easily. Saying " ahh " can make the tonsils easier to see. Look for white or yellow patches on the tonsils or the back of the throat. 

Contact the 
main health center for an appointment.

Lozenges with a topical anesthetic 
These lozenges release a weak topical anesthetic as they dissolve. The effect of this is that the anesthetic will sometimes numb everything in your mouth, especially your tongue. Examples of this type of medication include:

- Cepastat-Sore Throat Lozenges -
regular strength lozenges contain 14.5 mg Phenol
extra strength lozenges contain 29 mg Phenol

- Cepacol-Anesthetic Lozenges -
regular strength lozenges contain 10 mg Benzocaine and 0.07% Ceepryn

- Sucrets -
regular strength lozenges contain 2.0 mg Dyclonine Hydrochloride (an anesthetic)
maximum strength lozenges contain 3.0 mg Dyclonine Hydrochloride

- Chloraseptic Sore Throat Spray & Gargle -
This product, like the lozenges, is used for the temporary relief of minor throat or mouth pain; it contains 1.4% Phenol.

Menthol lozenges
Menthol provides a cooling sensation to aid in symptomatic relief of minor throat irritations. Menthol does not numb other parts of your mouth like the topical anesthetics. It provides relief mainly through the cooling sensation. Examples of this type of medication include:

- Cepacol-Dry Throat Lozenges -
different regular strength flavors contain 3.6-5.0 mg Menthol

- N'Ice-Medicated Sore Throat and Cough Lozenges -
regular strength lozenges contain 5.0 mg Menthol

- Halls Mentho-Lyptus Cough Suppressant Tablets -
regular strength tablets contain less than 10 mg Menthol 
maximum strength tablets contain 10 mg Menthol

Unmedicated lozenges 
Unmedicated lozenges, such as Hall's Vitamin C Drops, do not contain any medication. The bitter flavor causes your mouth to produce more saliva and, thus, keep your throat moister. This will help especially if you have a dry cough, but does not always have the same effects as a lozenge with menthol or benzocaine. The effects of unmedicated lozenges can also be achieved by drinking large amounts of water.

Over-the-counter medication
If you only have one or two symptoms, it is best to treat the individual symptoms rather than take a combination medication and treat symptoms you do not have. However, if you have multiple symptoms, you may decide to take a combination medication. Knowing the active ingredients in the medications will help you to decide which medications are best for you. Click on the different areas of illness to learn about over-the-counter medications. 

Warning
An over-the-counter (OTC) medication is one that you can buy without a prescription. However, do not assume that all OTC drugs are safe for you.
Carefully read the label of any OTC drug you use, especially if you are already taking a prescription medication or another OTC medication.
Check the expiration date on all packages. Old drugs may have lost their effectiveness.
Read the list of possible side effects associated with any OTC drug you are taking. Drugs can interact with other drugs, foods, or alcohol. Be sure you know when it is safe to take a medication. Also, overuse of medication can cause unwanted or severe side effects.
Do not take any drugs that do not have a label or that were prescribed for someone else.

Antibiotic Use