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History (HIST)

Chair: A. Barrera
DEPARTMENT SITE

Today the study of human history is critical to global survival; the experiences of others serve as guides to present and future conduct. At the same time, exposure to rigorous historical method and clear narrative style develops conceptual skills, research competence, writing fluency, and sensitivity to the uses and abuses of language and historical knowledge. The history department curriculum includes courses on African, Asian, Caribbean, European, Latin American, Middle Eastern, and North American subjects, and on contact and interaction among these societies. Majors are encouraged to take courses in related departments and programs. Competence in at least one foreign language is also desirable.

Advanced Placement

Colgate course credit is awarded to students receiving a score of 4 or 5 on the AP European History exam and the AP U.S. History exam. Students receiving a score of 4 or 5 on the AP European history exam receive a total of one course credit for HIST 101 (0.5 course credits) and HIST 102 (0.5 course credits). Students receiving a score of 4 or 5 on the AP U.S. history exam receive a total of one course credit for HIST 103(0.5 course credits) and HIST 104 (0.5 course credits). AP credit results in graduation credit but does not count towards the history major.

Students considering a major in history may begin with 100-level surveys or 200-level courses. The 100-level survey courses introduce students to the college-level study of history. Prospective majors with AP history credit should consider enrolling in 200-level history courses that pique their interest.

For further details, see the University Catalogue, or contact the department chair, Professor Antonio Barrera at abarrera@colgate.edu.

Courses

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ALST 282, The Making of Modern Africa
Surveys the history of Africa from 1880s to the contemporary period. Major themes will include: the imperial scramble and partition of Africa; African resistances; colonial rule in Africa; independence and problems of independence; socio-economic developments in independent Africa; ethnic conflicts; crises and contemporary issues.

HIST 102, Europe in Crisis since 1815
Explores the social, economic, political, and cultural history of Europe over the last two centuries. Topics include the revolutions of 1848, nationalism and the unification of Italy and Germany, the Industrial Revolution and the growth of socialism, imperialism and the alliance system, the Russian Revolution and the two World Wars, Stalinism and the fall of the Soviet Empire after 1989, and the development of the European Union. (EU)

HIST 103, American History to 1877
A broad survey of key patterns, events, and the history of peoples in America from ca. 1500 to 1877. Covers the breadth of Native American life and the effects of European settlement, the colonial and constitutional periods through the age of reform, the crisis of union, and the Civil War and Reconstruction. Prepares students for upper-level courses in early American history. (US)

HIST 106, The Making of Modern Africa
Surveys the history of Africa from 1880s to the contemporary period. Major themes will include: the imperial scramble and partition of Africa; African resistances; colonial rule in Africa; independence and problems of independence; socio-economic developments in independent Africa; ethnic conflicts; crises and contemporary issues. (AF)

HIST 199, History Workshop
Fall 2018 title: History Workshop: African American and American Historiography

Trains students in historical methods by focusing on research, writing, and communication skills. Students learn to understand historiographical debates, assemble and assess bibliographies, find and interpret primary sources, construct effective written arguments, cite sources correctly, and develop appropriate oral communication skills. Depending on the instructor, the course may also include the use of non-traditional sources such as film or material culture, as well as the interpretation of historic sites, monuments, and landscapes.

HIST 199, History Workshop
Trains students in historical methods by focusing on research, writing, and communication skills. Students learn to understand historiographical debates, assemble and assess bibliographies, find and interpret primary sources, construct effective written arguments, cite sources correctly, and develop appropriate oral communication skills. Depending on the instructor, the course may also include the use of non-traditional sources such as film or material culture, as well as the interpretation of historic sites, monuments, and landscapes.

HIST 209, Atlantic World, 1492-1800
The events that followed Columbus' accidental arrival in the New World in 1492 shaped the world in which we live today. This course explores the formation of the Atlantic communities as the result of interactions between European, African, and Native American peoples as well as the circulation of diseases, natural products, labor systems, imperial designs, economic policies, and frontier zones in the Atlantic world. Many of the consequences of this process of interaction were unintended. Students explore the configuration of European, African, and Native American societies before contact and the configuration of new communities in the New World; the slave trade and the establishment of the plantation complex from Brazil to South Carolina; the spread of Christianity in the New World; the development of scientific practices in the service of imperial and national states; the establishment of labor systems; and the different strategies of accommodation, resistance, and rebellion of the different actors trying to find/protect their place in the Atlantic world. This course intends to provide a regional framework for the study of colonial societies in the western hemisphere as well as for the study of emerging empires and states in Europe. (LAC)

HIST 210, Hist. of Hlth,Disease & Empire
A comparative approach to exploring issues of disease, health, and medicine in the context of European imperial projects around the globe. Focusing on the late 17th through the early 20th centuries, the course traces how global empires facilitated environmental changes and exchanges, as well as the spread of diseases across distant sites. Students will study the shifting understanding of disease and health, as well as health disparities between enslaved and colonized populations and colonizers. These disparities had far-reaching geopolitical, economic, and social ramifications, including major influences on ideas of race and human difference. Students will gain an understanding of how practices of medicine and public health developed in imperial contexts as contested techniques of governance. (TR)

HIST 211, Women's Rights in US History
Examines the social and cultural history of women in the United States from the Revolutionary era to the present day, tracing feminist ideas from the margins of democratic thought to the center of modern political discourse and culture. Students will explore how issues including race, class, region, religion, work, education, and generational differences have shaped women's lives and maintained gendered order in American society and how, in turn, women have shaped their lives in response to these issues, opportunities, and constraints. (US)

HIST 218, African Amer Struggle-Freedom
Surveys the presence of African Americans in the United States and their struggle for freedom under the concept of democracy. Examines African origins, the Middle Passage, the creation of an African American culture in slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the growth of black communities in the face of hostility, the African American impact on American culture, the Civil Rights movement, and the continuing struggle by African Americans to make democracy real. (US)

HIST 233, French Revolution: 1770-1815
An overview of one of the most tumultuous periods in modern European history. France experienced a range of different governments, from absolute monarchy, to the Reign of Terror, to the Napoleonic Empire, a progression that was accompanied by an expansion of the existing war (from 1792 on) into a massive European-wide war. There were serious claims for citizenship and equality from working class men, from women of all classes, and from slaves and free people of color in France’s colonial empire; there were disturbing acts of violence committed by crowds as well as by the government itself. The course is designed to introduce students to the major events and personalities and the political evolution of the state during this time, as well as to discuss some of the important historiographical arguments. (EU)

HIST 265, War and Violence in East Asia
Explores the place of war and violence in East Asian societies from 1200 to 1700. Among the many topics examined are samurai, ninja, martial arts, Ghenghis Khan, and piracy. First, students look at the internal organization of armies, their place in domestic politics and society, and their role in foreign relations. Second, they examine the impact of war on religion, economics, politics, and the arts. Third, because of its importance, violence was tightly linked to religion, literature, and popular theater. Finally, students consider the various ways that these traditions attempted to prevent, control, and manipulate violence through examining political philosophy, law codes, and social mores. (AS)

HIST 271, The First World War
Was the First World War a "tragic and unnecessary conflict," as one of its leading historians has recently suggested? Why did men continue to fight amid horror and misery? And how did total war rend the fabric of society, politics, and everyday life? To answer these and other questions, this course examines the First World War from a variety of perspectives. Attention will be paid to its origins and outbreak, its conduct by generals and common soldiers, its effect on women and workers, and its wide ranging consequences, both on individuals and empires. The course concludes with a discussion of how the First World War has shaped the world in which we live today. (TR)