Academic Program - Africana and Latin American Studies Skip Navigation

Africana and Latin American Studies

(For 2014–2015 academic year)

Professors Banner-Haley, Herbst, Hodges, Hyslop, Klugherz, Luciani, B.L. Moore (Director), Moran, Rojas
Associate Professors Bigenho, Etefa, Page

Advisory Committee Banner-Haley, Barrera, Gray, Haines, Herbst, R. Levine, Mandle, B.L. Moore (Director), Moran, Page, Roller, Simmons, Sweeney, Villarubia

The Africana and Latin American Studies (ALST) Program is an interdisciplinary program that studies the histories and cultures, both material and expressive, of the peoples of Africa, the Caribbean, and Latin America, and of African Americans in the United States. It draws heavily from several disciplines in the humanities (art, language, literature, music) and the social sciences (anthropology, archaeology, economics, geography, his-tory, political science, and sociology), as well as educational studies, philosophy, psychology, religion, and writing and rhetoric. The program offers a major and a minor with four different concentrations: African, African American, Caribbean, and Latin American studies. United by a shared historical connection within the Atlantic world, Africans, African Americans (US), Latin Americans, and the peoples of the Caribbean provide rich opportunities for interdisciplinary and comparative studies. The program offers students the opportunity to study one particular group of people in relation to others in the wider Atlantic world. It examines the indigenous civilizations of these regions and studies the impact of migration, imperialism and colonialism, racism, nationalism, and globalization in shaping the lives, ideas, and cultural identities of their inhabitants.
The major in Africana and Latin American studies consists of nine courses. Students concentrate in African studies, African American studies, Caribbean studies, or Latin America studies. Each concentration has a required introductory course, and all students are also required to take at least one approved course within the program from outside their own concentration. The minor consists of six courses.

Substitution of other appropriate or equivalent courses, independent studies, or special study groups for the requirements for each concentration may be possible, but must be approved by the Africana and Latin American Studies Program director. Transfer courses, field study, and one-time-only courses by visiting professors can be credited toward the major or minor only with approval of the program director. A minimum average GPA of 2.00 in the courses chosen to count toward the major or minor in Africana and Latin American studies is required for graduation.

Majors in the Africana and Latin American Studies Program may not pursue a minor in the program. Majors interested in pursuing a second major or a minor are urged to do so in one of the traditional departments rather than in another interdisciplinary program. The relationship between students and the coordinator of each concentration is a vital one, and it is imperative that each major and minor meet with the appropriate coordinator at least once a semester to assess progress toward meeting graduation requirements.

As with the major, the minor in Africana and Latin American studies allows the student to concentrate in African studies, African American studies, Caribbean studies, or Latin American studies. It consists of six courses.

African Studies

Coordinator J. Hyslop (Fall), M. Moran (Spring)
Africa, the second largest continent, combines a remarkable number of peoples and cultures. The continent possesses over fifty political units, and its 450 million people speak an estimated 600–800 distinct languages. The diversity of its cultures, modes of agriculture, and industrial production represent a broad spectrum of the human experience. Themes and topics of this concentration include the complexity of traditional African cultures, philosophies, and political institutions; the impact of the trans-Atlantic slave trade; the introduction of European colonialism; African nationalism and liberation movements; and the ethnic, economic, political, and international relations of the modern African state. Majors and minors have the opportunity to participate in the National Model African Union simulation, sponsored by Howard University in Washington, DC, through enrollment in the half-credit course, ALST 290.

The requirements for the ALST major with a concentration in African studies are as follows:
1. ALST 201/CORE 189C, Africa (serves as ALST introduction to African studies)
2. ALST 220, The Black Diaspora
3. A single-discipline methods course approved by the coordinator and the program director.
4. Four African studies electives (see the list below) should be chosen in consultation with the coordinator. Of the four electives, at least three courses must be at the 300 level or higher.
5. One additional 200- or 300-level elective must be selected from any area of the pro-gram outside of the student’s primary concentration.
6. ALST 480, Issues and Trends in Africana and Latin American Studies is the senior capstone seminar and is required for all majors. In the event that ALST 480 is not offered, students may substitute another seminar in consultation with the coordinator and the program director.
7. More than one Core Communities and Identities course may be counted toward the major, but only one Core course used to meet Liberal Arts Core Curriculum requirements may also be counted toward the major.
8. A student must complete major declaration procedures with the appropriate coordinator no later than the second term of the sophomore year, unless an exception is approved by the program director.
9. In the case of a double major, no more than two courses from the department of the second major may be counted for the ALST major, with the approval of the ALST director or respective coordinator.

The requirements for the ALST minor with a concentration in African studies are as follows:
1. ALST 201/CORE 189C, Africa (serves as ALST introduction to African studies)
2. ALST 220, The Black Diaspora
3. Four African studies electives, at least two courses must be at the 300 level or higher.
4. More than one Core Communities course may be counted toward the minor, but only one Core course used to meet Liberal Arts Core Curriculum requirements may also be counted toward the minor.
5. A student must complete minor declaration procedures with the appropriate coordinator as soon as possible but no later than the end of the drop/add period in the first term of the senior year.
6. No more than one course from the student’s major may be counted for the ALST minor.

African Studies Electives

Descriptions of most of these electives may be found under the appropriate departments, unless they are specific to this program in which case they will be found below.
ALST/HIST 281, Slavery and the Slave Trade in Africa
ALST/HIST 282, The Making of Modern Africa
ALST/HIST 284, Decolonization in Africa
ALST 290, Model African Union
ALST/FREN 354, Introduction to the Study of French Literature IV: the Franco-phone World
ALST/PCON 355, Rwanda since the 1994 Genocide
ALST 380, Movements for Social Justice in South Africa
ANTH 362, Political Anthropology: Conflict and Cooperation
ANTH 371, Gender and Society in Africa
ARTS/ANTH 248, African Art
CORE 169C, Rwanda
CORE 173C, Ethiopia
CORE 175C, Nigeria
CORE 185C, The Sahara
CORE 190C, South Africa
CORE 195C, West Africa
ECON 238, Economic Development
ENGL 333, African/Diaspora Women’s Narrative
ENGL 337, African Literature
FREN 455, Francophone Voices from North Africa
GEOG/PCON 310, Geopolitics
GEOG 316, Medical Geography and Disease Ecology
GEOG/PCON 317, Dispossession, Dislocation, and Diseases: Geographies of Population Vulnerability
GEOG 320, Globalization, Development, and Environment
HIST 209, The Atlantic World, 1492–1800
HIST 381, Pre-Colonial Africa
HIST 382, Modern Africa
HIST 384, Somalia: From Independence to Collapse
HIST 385, Darfur in Historical Perspective
HIST 462, Seminar on Problems in African History
POSC 213, Comparative Politics: The Third World
POSC 319, Power and Protest in Southern Africa
POSC 331, Politics in Sub-Saharan Africa
POSC 350, Africa in World Politics
POSC 451, Seminar: Africa in World Politics
RELG 235, Religion, War, Peace, and Reconciliation
RELG 248, Christianity, Islam, and Political Change in Africa
RELG 289, African Religious Traditions


African American Studies

Coordinator C. Banner-Haley
The African American experience in the United States has been the result of a complex history spanning almost four hundred years centered on enslavement, racial violence, segregation, and discrimination. This concentration not only focuses on African Americans’ resistance to those manifest injustices, but it also examines their significant contributions to the economy, society, and culture of the United States, as well as their achievements in politics, education, art, science, and in the economy. Some of the major themes studied are slavery and abolition; the politics of race and racism; black leadership, the civil rights movement, and the continuing struggle for social justice; as well as social and cultural phenomena like the Harlem Renaissance and the rise of a black middle class.

The requirements for the ALST major with a concentration in African American studies are as follows:
1. ALST 202, Introduction to African American Studies
2. ALST 220, The Black Diaspora
3. A single-discipline methods course approved by the coordinator and the program director.
4. Four African American studies electives (see the list below) should be chosen in consultation with the coordinator. Of the four electives, at least three courses must be at the 300 level or higher.
5. One additional 200- or 300-level elective must be selected from any area of the program outside of the student’s primary concentration.
6. ALST 480, Issues and Trends in Africana and Latin American Studies is the senior capstone seminar and is required for all majors. In the event that ALST 480 is not offered, students may substitute another seminar in consultation with the coordinator and the program director.
7. More than one Core Communities and Identities course may be counted toward the major, but only one Core course used to meet Liberal Arts Core Curriculum requirements may also be counted toward the major.
8. A student must complete major declaration procedures with the appropriate coordinator no later than the second term of the sophomore year, unless an exception is approved by the program director.
9. In the case of a double major, no more than two courses from the department of the second major may be counted for the ALST major, with the approval of the ALST direc-tor or respective coordinator.

The requirements for the ALST minor with a concentration in African American studies are as follows:
1. ALST 202, Introduction to African American Studies
2. ALST 220, The Black Diaspora
3. Four African American studies electives, at least two courses must be at the 300 level or higher.
4. More than one Core Communities and Identities course may be counted toward the minor, but only one Core course used to meet Liberal Arts Core Curriculum requirements may also be counted toward the minor.
5. A student must complete minor declaration procedures with the appropriate coordinator as soon as possible but no later than the end of the drop/add period in the first term of the senior year.
6. No more than one course from the student’s major may be counted for the ALST minor.

African American Studies Electives

Descriptions of most of these electives may be found under the appropriate departments, unless they are specific to this program in which case they will be found below.
ALST/POSC 212, Politics of Race and Ethnicity
ALST/SOCI 321, Black Communities
ALST/SOCI 330, Race and Crime
ALST/PHIL 332, Philosophy of Race and Racism
ALST/PHIL 345, Topics in African-American Philosophy
ALST 350, The Harlem Renaissance: An Interdisciplinary Survey
CORE 144S, The Psychology of Oppression
ECON 238, Economic Development
ECON 382, American Economic History
ECON 438, Seminar in Economic Development
ECON 482, Seminar in American Economic History
EDUC 205, Race and Education
ENGL 205, Literature and Cultural Study: The Jazz Age
ENGL 209, American Texts and Contexts: African American Modernisms
ENGL 309, Fiction (African American topic)
ENGL 334, African American Literature
ENGL 434, The Harlem Renaissance
ENST 232, Environmental Justice
HIST 103, American History to 1877
HIST 104, The United States since 1877
HIST 218, The African American Struggle for Freedom and Democracy
HIST 303, The Nation on Trial 1787–1861
HIST 319, African American Leadership and Social Movements
HIST 320, New York City History
HIST 475, Seminar in African American History
MUSI 161, The History of Jazz
POSC 415, Seminar: Social Justice Politics and Policy
SOCI 212, Power, Racism, and Privilege
SOCI 305, Urban Sociology
SOCI 312, Social Inequality
SOCI 361, Power, Politics, and Social Change
WRIT 346, Language, Race, and Ethnicity in the US


Caribbean Studies

Coordinator K. Page
The Caribbean forms an important historical and cultural bridge between Africa and Afro-America, and was the birthplace of European settlement and colonization in the Americas. Better known in the United States as a tourist destination, the region has a rich but tragic history intimately connected with Euro-American imperialism and plantation slavery. Nevertheless, by bringing together people of widely diverse ethnicities from all over the world, the plantations became a virtual laboratory of socio-cultural engineering to produce some of the earliest and most complex multiracial societies. In conjunction with a study group that spends a semester at the University of the West Indies, ALST majors within the Caribbean concentration are exposed to a diverse range of issues relating to race relations, cultural identity, political governance, and economic development that are embedded in the history, literature, politics, and economies of the territories of the region.

The requirements for the ALST major with a concentration in Caribbean studies are as follows:
1. ALST 203/CORE 163C, The Caribbean (serves as ALST introduction to Caribbean studies)
2. ALST 220, The Black Diaspora
3. A single-discipline methods course approved by the coordinator and the program director.
4. Four Caribbean studies electives (see the list below) should be chosen in consultation with the coordinator. Of the four electives, at least three courses must be at the 300 level or higher.
5. One additional 200- or 300-level elective must be selected from any area of the program outside of the student’s primary concentration.
6. ALST 480, Issues and Trends in Africana and Latin American Studies is the senior capstone seminar and is required for all majors. In the event that ALST 480 is not offered, students may substitute another seminar in consultation with the coordinator and the program director.
7. More than one Core Communities and Identities course may be counted toward the major, but only one Core course used to meet Liberal Arts Core Curriculum requirements may also be counted toward the major.
8. A student must complete major declaration procedures with the appropriate coordinator no later than the second term of the sophomore year, unless an exception is approved by the program director.
9. In the case of a double major, no more than two courses from the department of the second major may be counted for the ALST major, with the approval of the ALST director or respective coordinator.

The requirements for the ALST minor with a concentration in Caribbean studies are as follows:
1. ALST 203/CORE 163C, The Caribbean (serves as ALST Introduction to Caribbean studies)
2. ALST 220, The Black Diaspora
3. Four Caribbean studies electives, at least two courses must be at the 300 level or higher.
4. More than one Core Communities and Identities course may be counted toward the minor, but only one Core course used to meet Liberal Arts Core Curriculum requirements may also be counted toward the minor.
5. A student must complete minor declaration procedures with the appropriate coordinator as soon as possible but no later than the end of the drop/add period in the first term of the senior year.
6. No more than one course from the student’s major may be counted for the ALST minor.

Caribbean Studies Electives

Descriptions of most of these electives may be found under the appropriate departments, unless they are specific to this program in which case they will be found below.
ALST/HIST 225, Jamaica: From Colony to Independence
ALST/HIST 228, The Caribbean: Conquest, Colonization, and Self-Determination
ALST/HIST 326, Jamaican Culture
ALST/HIST 327, Authoritarianism, Dictatorship, and Democracy in the Caribbe-an
ALST/HIST 377, History of Culture in the Caribbean
ALST/HIST 378, Systems of Forced Labor in the Caribbean
ALST/HIST 455, Race, Class and Culture in Anglophone Caribbean Society after Slavery
ALST/LING 210, Speaking in Tongues: Linguistics, Language Learning, and Language Teaching
CORE 154S, Caribbean Ecology and Environmental Concerns
ECON 238, Economic Development
ECON 438, Seminar in Economic Development
ENGL 207, New Immigrant Voices
ENGL 333, African/Diaspora Women’s Narrative
ENGL 363, Contemporary Fiction (Caribbean topic)
ENGL 433, Caribbean Literature
HIST 209, The Atlantic World, 1492–1800
HIST 322, Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
SPAN 226, Latin American Women Writers
SPAN 478, Literature of the Caribbean


Latin American Studies

Coordinator F. Luciani
Latin America has a complex history, a variety of cultures and political systems, a literature of international stature, and an important place in world affairs. The ALST Latin American concentration offers students the opportunity to undertake a comparative and interdisciplinary study of Latin American society and culture, drawing from such disciplines as anthropology, archaeology, art and art history, economics, geography, history, literature and literary criticism, political science, and music.

The requirements for the ALST major with a concentration in Latin American studies are as follows:
1. ALST 230, Introduction to Latin American Studies
2. SPAN 354/355, Latin American Literature, or a language equivalent is required
3. A single-discipline methods course approved by the coordinator and the program director.
4. Four Latin American studies electives (see the list below) should be chosen in consultation with the coordinator. Of the four electives, at least three courses must be at the 300 level or higher.
5. One additional 200- or 300-level elective must be selected from any area of the program outside of the student’s primary concentration.
6. ALST 480, Issues and Trends in Africana and Latin American Studies is the senior capstone seminar and is required for all majors. In the event that ALST 480 is not offered, students may substitute another seminar in consultation with the coordinator and the program director.
7. More than one Core Communities and Identities course may be counted toward the major, but only one Core course used to meet Liberal Arts Core Curriculum requirements may also be counted toward the major.
8. A student must complete major declaration procedures with the appropriate coordinator no later than the second term of the sophomore year, unless an exception is approved by the program director.
9. In the case of a double major, no more than two courses from the department of the second major may be counted for the ALST major, with the approval of the ALST director or respective coordinator.

The requirements for the ALST minor with a concentration in Latin American studies are as follows:
1. ALST 230, Introduction to Latin American Studies
2. SPAN 354/355, Latin American Literature, or a language equivalent is required
3. Four Latin American studies electives, at least two courses must be at the 300 level or higher.
4. More than one Core Communities and Identities course may be counted toward the minor, but only one Core course used to meet Liberal Arts Core Curriculum requirements may also be counted toward the minor.
5. A student must complete minor declaration procedures with the appropriate coordinator as soon as possible but no later than the end of the drop/add period in the first term of the senior year.
6. No more than one course from the student’s major may be counted for the ALST minor.

Latin American Studies Electives

Descriptions of most of these electives may be found under the appropriate departments, unless they are specific to this program in which case they will be found below.
ALST/HIST 228, The Caribbean: Conquest, Colonization, and Self-Determination
ALST/GEOG 309, Latin American: Critical Landscapes of Development
ALST/ANTH 357, Indigenous Politics of Latin America
ALST/ANTH 363, Globalization and Change in Latin America
ALST/ANTH 365, Andean Lives
ANTH 231, The Archaeology of the Ancient Maya
ANTH 255, Global Latin America: Communities, Commodities, and Cultural Change
ANTH 373, Native Heritage of Mexico and Central America
ANTH 376, Archaeology of the Inkas and their Ancestors
ARTS/ANTH 249, Art and Architecture of the Ancient Americas
CORE 171C, Mexico
CORE 177C, Peru
CORE 182C, Guatemala
CORE 193C, Brazil
ECON 238, Economic Development
ECON 438, Seminar in Economic Development
EDUC 308, Comparative Education
HIST 209, The Atlantic World, 1492–1800
HIST 230, The Making of Latin America
HIST 231, Resistance and Revolt in Latin America
HIST 322, Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
POSC 354, Capitalism, the State, and Development in Latin America
SPAN 226, Latin American Women Writers
SPAN 354, Latin American Literature: Illusion, Fantasy, Magical Realism
SPAN 361, Advanced Composition and Stylistics
SPAN 466, Colonial Latin American Literature
SPAN 467, 19th-Century Latin American Literature
SPAN 477, Women Writing in Latin America
SPAN 478, Literature of the Caribbean


Honors and High Honors

Majors may graduate with honors or high honors in Africana and Latin American studies. Qualifications for honors include, at graduation, a minimum overall average of 3.00, a major average of 3.30, and a successful defense before a designated faculty committee of an honors paper or project prepared under the direction of a member of the Africana and Latin American studies faculty. The committee that evaluates the final paper will be identified by the program director in consultation with the student and the student’s faculty adviser. Prospective honors students should notify the appropriate coordinators of their intentions by the first week of October of the senior year. A student with a double major in Africana and Latin American studies and a second field may apply for honors in both areas by submitting and defending a paper in each. The paper topics may be related, but the focus and/or content of the two papers must differ substantially. Beyond the requirements for honors, high honors requires a major average of 3.7. High honors projects are usually begun in the fall of the senior year. Students who expect to qualify for honors or high honors should register for ALST 499.

Awards

See “Honors and Awards: Africana and Latin American Studies” in Chapter VI.

Study Groups and Field Projects

Study Groups Periodically, the Africana and Latin American Studies Program has sponsored study groups in Africa, Latin America, or the Caribbean under the direction of faculty members associated with the program. Decisions on the awarding of credits are set prior to the consolidation of each study group. See Off-Campus Study Group Programs; in Chapter VI for further information about an interdisciplinary study group in Jamaica.

Additionally, the Africana and Latin American Studies Program supports extended study groups to South Africa (CORE 190C) and Mexico (CORE 191C). For more information, see Extended Study Programs; in Chapter VI.

Model African Union Project The Africana and Latin American Studies Program participates in the Model African Union, held each spring at Howard University, Washington, D.C. Highlights of the trip include visits to the embassies of the African countries the Colgate team is representing, as well as engaging in debate with student representatives from over thirty colleges and universities across the country. The program is offered as a half-credit course, ALST 290.

Course Offerings

Courses unique to the Africana and Latin American Studies Program are described be-low. Descriptions of other courses noted above may be found under appropriate depart-ments.

201 Africa
Staff
This course is an introduction to African studies including African history, political development, culture and literature, economics, gender issues, and Africa’s role in world affairs. To give students a deepened understanding and appreciation of Africa, they may attend the Model African Union in Washington, D.C., or travel to select African countries on extended study. This course serves as the introduction to African studies. This course is crosslisted as CORE 189C.

202 Introduction to African American Studies
Staff
This is an introductory course to the field of African American studies. It is interdisciplinary and utilizes materials drawn from the fields of history, sociology, literature, social psychology, and political science. It is a course which seeks to acquaint students with the cutting-edge work that is going on in this area and give students a broad understanding of the place and contributions that African Americans have made to society in the United States.

203 The Caribbean
K. Page
This is an interdisciplinary course that introduces students to the field of Caribbean studies. It uses literature, film, and the music of the region to explore the historical, societal, cultural, political, and economic development of the Caribbean. It also explores gender issues in the region. It is one of the required courses for students who seek to participate in the West Indies Study Group. This course serves as the introduction to Caribbean studies. This course is crosslisted as CORE 163C.

210 Speaking in Tongues: Linguistics, Language Teaching, and Language Learning
This course is crosslisted as LING 210. For course description, see "Linguistics: Course Offerings."

212 The Politics of Race and Ethnicity
This course is crosslisted as POSC 212. For course description, see "Political Science: Course Offerings."

220 The Black Diaspora: Africans at Home and Abroad
B.L. Moore
This course focuses on the African presence in the Americas. It examines the responses of Africans and their descendants to the experiences of enslavement, racism, colonialism, and imperialism from the fifteenth century to the present; and analyzes the impact of the African presence on western “civilization.” It also explores the evolution of an African identity, particularly, an identification with the destiny of the African continent among African descendants in the Diaspora.

225 Jamaica: From Colony to Independence
This course is crosslisted as HIST 225. For course description, see "History: Course Offerings."

228 The Caribbean: Conquest, Colonialism, and Self-Determination
This course is crosslisted as HIST 228. For course description, see "History: Course Offerings."

230 Introduction to Latin American Studies
L. Rojas
This course is an introduction to the development of Latin America’s diverse and distinctive cultural heritage and to its contemporary institutions and civilization. The study of pre-Columbian and New World cultures of Spanish and Portuguese America focuses on the interactions of Indian, European, and African cultures and the complexities of what is known as Latin American culture. The course, though not a historical survey, examines the historical origins of contemporary social, cultural, economic, and political issues in Latin America, and in those parts of the world that have been affected by significant numbers of Latin American immigrants. The approach is broadly multidisciplinary, reflecting various perspectives and materials. The course includes lectures, films, and discussions, as well as exhibits and performances when available.

281 Slavery and the Slave Trade in Africa
This course is crosslisted as HIST 281. For course description, see "History: Course Offerings."

282 The Making of Modern Africa
This course is crosslisted as HIST 282. For course description, see "History: Course Offerings."

284 Decolonization in Africa
This course is crosslisted as HIST 284. For course description, see "History: Course Offerings."

290 Model African Union
Staff
A 0.50-credit course. The Model African Union is an annual national student simulation of the workings of a large multilateral organization, the African Union. Composed of 53 member states, the African Union was constituted in 2000 as the successor to the Organization of African Unity (OAU). Its objectives are to achieve continental integration, similar to that of the European Union, in balance with recognizing the national sovereignty of its member states. The Model African Union is in session for four days in late February, hosted by Howard University in Washington D.C., and students from more than 20 colleges and universities around the country participate. The on-campus portion of the course meets weekly for the five weeks prior to the trip and one week after, for debriefing. Students are assigned to specific country delegations and committees, research and prepare position papers, draft resolutions, debate and vote on action items, and generally take on the roles of African diplomats. The trip includes a visit to the embassy of the country each delegation is representing. May be taken more than once, with different country and committee assignments each year. Prerequisite: ALST 201/CORE 189C or another African studies course, or permission of instructor.

309 Latin America: Critical Landscapes of Development
This course is crosslisted as GEOG 309. For course description, see "Geography: Course Offerings."

321 Black Communities

This course is crosslisted as SOCI 321. For course description, see "Sociology and Anthropology: Course Offerings."

327 Authoritarianism, Dictatorships, and Democracy in the Caribbean
This course is crosslisted as HIST 327. For course description, see "History: Course Offerings."

330 Race and Crime
This course is crosslisted as SOCI 330. For course description, see "Sociology and Anthropology: Course Offerings.";

332 Philosophy of Race and Racism
This course is crosslisted as PHIL 332. For course description, see "Philosophy: Course Offerings."

345 Topics in African-American Philosophy
This course is crosslisted as PHIL 345. For course description, see "Philosophy: Course Offerings."

350 The Harlem Renaissance: An Interdisciplinary Survey
M. Coyle
This interdisciplinary, multimedia course explores the cultural, political, artistic, and economic formations that emerged from the 1920s era known as the Harlem Renaissance. The course is intended as a tie-in with the Harlem Renaissance Center as part of the Residential Living and Learning Program. The goal is two-fold: first, to introduce students to the key historical and social developments of the period, and to the culture, literature, music, and art that made this such an important moment in American and African American history; and second, to demonstrate that this history comprises a living legacy pertinent to the ideas of Colgate University. Students reconstruct the historical context of the Great Migration that made possible the economic development of Harlem, the art of the Renaissance, and the politics of its affiliated New Negro movement. The course addresses issues of aesthetics and representation in early 20th-century African-American art, music, literature, and culture. Students study how questions of race, gender, and sexuality impacted the creative expression of black writers and artists. Students work with a variety of literary genres and a number of cultural forms. The course also includes guest lecturers who address a diverse array of topics.

354 Introduction to the Study of French Literature IV: the Francophone World
This course is crosslisted as FREN 354. For course description, see "Romance Languages: Course Offerings, French."

355 Rwanda since the 1994 Genocide

This course is crosslisted as PCON 355. For course description, see "Peace and Conflict Studies: Course Offerings."

357 Indigenous Politics of Latin America
This course is crosslisted as ANTH 357. For course description, see "Sociology and Anthropology: Course Offerings."

363 Globalization and Social Change in Latin America
This course is crosslisted as ANTH 363. For course description, see "Sociology and Anthropology: Course Offerings."

365 Andean Lives
This course is crosslisted as ANTH 365. For course description, see "Sociology and Anthropology: Course Offerings."

377 History of Culture in the Caribbean
This course is crosslisted as HIST 377. For course description, see "History: Course Offerings."

377L Exploring the Interplay of Culture, Language, and Identity in Martinique
This course is crosslisted as HIST 377L. For course description, see "History: Course Offerings."

378 Systems of Forced Labor in the Caribbean
This course is crosslisted as HIST 378. For course description, see "History: Course Offerings."

380 Movements for Social Justice in South Africa
M. Moran, M. Stern
This course considers social movements in the specific context of South Africa, a country which has been transformed by and continues to experience large-scale civil society mobilizations. South Africa’s unusual heritage of settler colonialism, enforced racial segregation, and explosive economic growth fueled by resources like gold and diamonds combine to make the country a perfect setting in which to investigate the efforts of diverse groups of citizens to achieve a more just and equitable society. Theoretical models drawn from sociology and anthropology expose how social movements originate, succeed, fail, and transform. These models are then applied to the specific history of South Africa, including the early development of non-violent protests, multi-racial labor movements, and the rise of the African National Congress and other anti-apartheid groups. In addition, the ongoing struggles for social justice since the democratic transition in 1994 are addressed, focusing particularly on movements for environmental justice, the rights of indigenous peoples, and access to adequate health care and schooling. New social media, art forms, and networking technologies that have transformed the ability of civil society groups to mobilize are also considered. The on-campus portion of the course is followed by a three-week extended study trip to two South African cities. As a final project, students use their experience to write a proposal for advanced research on a particular social movement.

455 Race, Class, and Culture in Anglophone Caribbean Society after Slavery

This course is crosslisted as HIST 455. For course description, see "History: Course Offerings."

477 Seminar in Latin American Studies
Staff
This course provides an opportunity for students to explore the historical, philosophical, and literary movements that have shaped the Latin American experience in the 20th century. The seminar is interdisciplinary, but the concentration of the study varies with the instructor. The seminar considers texts, songs, paintings, and films that give expression to the movements in question. Prerequisites: three courses in Latin American studies or permission of instructor. A 400-level seminar in a related department or discipline focusing on specific Latin American material may sometimes be substituted for ALST 477 with the approval of the program director.

480 Issues and Trends in Africana and Latin American Studies
Staff
This senior capstone seminar exposes majors and minors in Africana and Latin American Studies to research in all areas through the theme of the course, through their individual projects, and through the faculty who visit the class to talk about research issues and trends in each of four program concentrations: African studies, African American studies, Caribbean studies, and Latin American studies. It requires students to make broad connections between the four areas and challenges them to reflect deeply on theoretical ideas and developments in each individual area. The content of the seminars is interdisciplinary, theoretical issues that have significantly shaped the fields of Africana and Latin American studies are emphasized, and students complete major research projects demonstrating familiarity with relevant theory and methodology.

291, 391, 491 Independent Study

499 Honors Studies